In this category:

Or see the index

All categories

  1. AUDIO, CINEMA, RADIO & TV
  2. DANCE
  3. DICTIONARY OF IDEAS
  4. EXHIBITION – art, art history, photos, paintings, drawings, sculpture, ready-mades, video, performing arts, collages, gallery, etc.
  5. FICTION & NON-FICTION – books, booklovers, lit. history, biography, essays, translations, short stories, columns, literature: celtic, beat, travesty, war, dada & de stijl, drugs, dead poets
  6. FLEURSDUMAL POETRY LIBRARY – classic, modern, experimental & visual & sound poetry, poetry in translation, city poets, poetry archive, pre-raphaelites, editor's choice, etc.
  7. LITERARY NEWS & EVENTS – art & literature news, in memoriam, festivals, city-poets, writers in Residence
  8. MONTAIGNE
  9. MUSEUM OF LOST CONCEPTS – invisible poetry, conceptual writing, spurensicherung
  10. MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY – department of ravens & crows, birds of prey, riding a zebra
  11. MUSEUM OF PUBLIC PROTEST
  12. MUSIC
  13. PRESS & PUBLISHING
  14. REPRESSION OF WRITERS, JOURNALISTS & ARTISTS
  15. STORY ARCHIVE – olv van de veestraat, reading room, tales for fellow citizens
  16. STREET POETRY
  17. THEATRE
  18. TOMBEAU DE LA JEUNESSE – early death: writers, poets & artists who died young
  19. ULTIMATE LIBRARY – danse macabre, ex libris, grimm & co, fairy tales, art of reading, tales of mystery & imagination, sherlock holmes theatre, erotic poetry, ideal women
  20. WAR & PEACE
  21. ·




  1. Subscribe to new material:
    RSS     ATOM

CLASSIC POETRY

· Lord Byron: Oh! Snatched Away in Beauty’s Bloom (Poem) · Robert Southey: The Pauper’s Funeral (Poem) · Victor Hugo: Les femmes sont sur la terre . . . . (Poème) · Lord Byron: So we’ll go no more a roving (Poem) · Lord Byron: By the Rivers of Babylon We Sat Down and Wept (Poem) · Karel van de Woestijne: Stad (Gedicht) · Will Streets: Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916 (Poem) · Victor Hugo: L’Enfant (Poème) · Lord Byron: Remind me not, remind me not (Poem) · Karel van de Woestijne: Gij draagt een schone vlechte haar… (Gedicht) · Victor Hugo: Le Poëte (Poème) · Lord Byron: It is the hour (Poem)

»» there is more...

Lord Byron: Oh! Snatched Away in Beauty’s Bloom (Poem)

    

Oh! Snatched Away in Beauty’s Bloom

Oh! snatched away in beauty’s bloom,
On thee shall press no ponderous tomb;
But on thy turf shall roses rear
Their leaves, the earliest of the year;
And the wild cypress wave in tender
gloom:

And oft by yon blue gushing stream
Shall sorrow lean her drooping head,
And feed deep thought with many a dream,
And lingering pause and lightly tread;
Fond wretch! as if her step disturbed the
dead!

Away! we know that tears are vain,
That death nor heeds nor hears distress:
Will this unteach us to complain?
Or make one mourner weep the less?
And thou – who tell’st me to forget,
Thy looks are wan, thine eyes are wet.

George Gordon Byron
(1788 – 1824)
Oh! Snatched Away in Beauty’s Bloom
(Poem)

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Robert Southey: The Pauper’s Funeral (Poem)

  This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Southey-robert-1.jpeg

The Pauper’s Funeral

What! and not one to heave the pious sigh!
Not one whose sorrow-swoln and aching eye
For social scenes, for life’s endearments fled,
Shall drop a tear and dwell upon the dead!
Poor wretched Outcast! I will weep for thee,
And sorrow for forlorn humanity.
Yes I will weep, but not that thou art come
To the stern Sabbath of the silent tomb:
For squalid Want, and the black scorpion Care,
Heart-withering fiends! shall never enter there.
I sorrow for the ills thy life has known
As thro’ the world’s long pilgrimage, alone,
Haunted by Poverty and woe-begone,
Unloved, unfriended, thou didst journey on:
Thy youth in ignorance and labour past,
And thine old age all barrenness and blast!
Hard was thy Fate, which, while it doom’d to woe,
Denied thee wisdom to support the blow;
And robb’d of all its energy thy mind,
Ere yet it cast thee on thy fellow-kind,
Abject of thought, the victim of distress,
To wander in the world’s wide wilderness.

Poor Outcast sleep in peace! the wintry storm
Blows bleak no more on thine unshelter’d form;
Thy woes are past; thou restest in the tomb;–
I pause–and ponder on the days to come.

Robert Southey
(1774 – 1843)
The Pauper’s Funeral

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive S-T, Archive S-T, CLASSIC POETRY


Victor Hugo: Les femmes sont sur la terre . . . . (Poème)

 

Les femmes sont sur la terre . . . .

Les femmes sont sur la terre
Pour tout idéaliser ;
L’univers est un mystère
Que commente leur baiser.

C’est l’amour qui, pour ceinture,
A l’onde et le firmament,
Et dont toute la nature,
N’est, au fond, que l’ornement.

Tout ce qui brille, offre à l’âme
Son parfum ou sa couleur ;
Si Dieu n’avait fait la femme,
Il n’aurait pas fait la fleur.

A quoi bon vos étincelles,
Bleus saphirs, sans les yeux doux ?
Les diamants, sans les belles,
Ne sont plus que des cailloux ;

Et, dans les charmilles vertes,
Les roses dorment debout,
Et sont des bouches ouvertes
Pour ne rien dire du tout.

Tout objet qui charme ou rêve
Tient des femmes sa clarté ;
La perle blanche, sans Eve,
Sans toi, ma fière beauté,

Ressemblant, tout enlaidie,
A mon amour qui te fuit,
N’est plus que la maladie
D’une bête dans la nuit.

Victor Hugo
(1802-1885)
Les femmes sont sur la terre . . . .
(Poème)

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive G-H, Archive G-H, Hugo, Victor, Victor Hugo


Lord Byron: So we’ll go no more a roving (Poem)

 

So we’ll go no more a roving

So we’ll go no more a roving
So late into the night,
Though the heart be still as loving,
And the moon be still as bright.

For the sword outwears its sheath,
And the soul wears out the breast,
And the heart must pause to breathe,
And Love itself have rest.

Though the night was made for loving,
And the day returns too soon,
Yet we’ll go no more a roving
By the light of the moon.

George Gordon Byron
(1788 – 1824)
So we’ll go no more a roving
(Poem)

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Lord Byron: By the Rivers of Babylon We Sat Down and Wept (Poem)

 

By the Rivers of Babylon
We Sat Down and Wept

1
We sat down and wept by the waters
Of Babel, and thought of the day
When our foe, in the hue of his slaughters,
Made Salem’s high places his prey;
And ye, oh her desolate daughters!
Were scattered all weeping away.

2
While sadly we gazed on the river
Which rolled on in freedom below,
They demanded the song; but, oh never
That triumph the stranger shall know!
May this right hand be withered for ever,
Ere it string our high harp for the foe!

3
On the willow that harp is suspended,
Oh Salem! its sound should be free;
And the hour when thy glories were
ended
But left me that token of thee:
And ne’er shall its soft tones be blended
With the voice of the spoiler by me!

George Gordon Byron
(1788 – 1824)
By the Rivers of Babylon We Sat Down and Wept
(Poem)

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Karel van de Woestijne: Stad (Gedicht)

Stad

Verloren tijd, hoe schoon vind ik u weer,
waar elk herinnren wordt een nieuw verlangen.

o Steden-laan, wat zijn uw meisjes schoon.
Eens was ik jong, en ‘k ben niet jong gebleven…

Ik wandel bij de bomen die mijn jeugd
beveiligd hebben en haar jonge liefde.

Water is de adem van een meisjes mond
De stad is heet en droog als een begeerte.

Er is, tussen de dubble glans der laan,
er is een maan, er is een andre maan.
De een is de maan; de andere is gene maan.

Het paard wringt als een zilvren vis. En de ijlte is rood
maar roder zet de galm des voermans de ijlte uit.
Hitte.

Mijn vriend, gij hebt de geur der grote magazijnen.
Zo zijn er meisjes, schraal en met een witte neus.

Leeg schelpje aan nachtlijke ebbe: ik; maar de stad
in duizend dake’ als duizend diamanten.

Ik scheer de muren; – als een rechthoek ligt
naast mij mijn schaduw als een vals gedicht.

Menigte, uw geur bijt mijne lippen stuk.
o Menigte, gij doet mijne woorden bloeden.

Waarom te wenen in dit stenen woud?
Gij zult regeren als gij weet te lachen.

Jaag naar huis, o hart: gij vindt er
volle schotelen aan leed.

Stad: eind-punt; vierkant; rust en zekerheid.
‘k Zet me op een paal; ik wacht de roep der ijlte.

Karel van de Woestijne
(1878 – 1929)
Stad

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Archive W-X, Woestijne, Karel van de


Will Streets: Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916 (Poem)

  This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is john-william-streets101-5.jpeg

Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916

Impressions are like winds; you feel their cool
Swift kiss upon the brow, yet know not where
They sprang to birth: so like a pool
Rippled by winds from out their forest lair
My soul was stir’d to life; its twilight fled;
There passed across its solitude a dream
That wing’d with supreme ecstasy did seem;
That gave the kiss of life to long-lost dead.

A lark trill’d in the blue: and suddenly
Upon the wings of his immortal ode
My soul rushed singing to the ether sky
And found in visions, dreams, its real abode –
I fled with Shelly, with the lark afar,
Unto the realms where the eternal are.

John William (Will) Streets
(1886 –1916)
Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916
• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: - Archive Tombeau de la jeunesse, Archive S-T, Shelley, Percy Byssche, Streets, Will, WAR & PEACE


Victor Hugo: L’Enfant (Poème)

 

L’Enfant

Les turcs ont passé là. Tout est ruine et deuil.
Chio, l’île des vins, n’est plus qu’un sombre écueil,
Chio, qu’ombrageaient les charmilles,
Chio, qui dans les flots reflétait ses grands bois,
Ses coteaux, ses palais, et le soir quelquefois
Un chœur dansant de jeunes filles.

Tout est désert. Mais non ; seul près des murs noircis,
Un enfant aux yeux bleus, un enfant grec, assis,
Courbait sa tête humiliée ;
Il avait pour asile, il avait pour appui
Une blanche aubépine, une fleur, comme lui
Dans le grand ravage oubliée.

Ah ! pauvre enfant, pieds nus sur les rocs anguleux !
Hélas ! pour essuyer les pleurs de tes yeux bleus
Comme le ciel et comme l’onde,
Pour que dans leur azur, de larmes orageux,
Passe le vif éclair de la joie et des jeux,
Pour relever ta tête blonde,

Que veux-tu ? Bel enfant, que te faut-il donner
Pour rattacher gaîment et gaîment ramener
En boucles sur ta blanche épaule
Ces cheveux, qui du fer n’ont pas subi l’affront,
Et qui pleurent épars autour de ton beau front,
Comme les feuilles sur le saule ?

Qui pourrait dissiper tes chagrins nébuleux ?
Est-ce d’avoir ce lys, bleu comme tes yeux bleus,
Qui d’Iran borde le puits sombre ?
Ou le fruit du tuba, de cet arbre si grand,
Qu’un cheval au galop met, toujours en courant,
Cent ans à sortir de son ombre ?

Veux-tu, pour me sourire, un bel oiseau des bois,
Qui chante avec un chant plus doux que le hautbois,
Plus éclatant que les cymbales ?
Que veux-tu ? fleur, beau fruit, ou l’oiseau merveilleux ?
– Ami, dit l’enfant grec, dit l’enfant aux yeux bleus,
Je veux de la poudre et des balles.

8-10 juillet 1828

Victor Hugo
(1802-1885)
L’Enfant
(Poème)
Les Orientales

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive G-H, Archive G-H, Hugo, Victor, Victor Hugo


Lord Byron: Remind me not, remind me not (Poem)

 

Remind me not, remind me not

Remind me not, remind me not,
Of those beloved, those vanish’d hours,
When all my soul was given to thee;
Hours that may never be forgot,
Till Time unnerves our vital powers,
And thou and I shall cease to be.

Can I forget—canst thou forget,
When playing with thy golden hair,
How quick thy fluttering heart did move?
Oh! by my soul, I see thee yet,
With eyes so languid, breast so fair,
And lips, though silent, breathing love.

When thus reclining on my breast,
Those eyes threw back a glance so sweet,
As half reproach’d yet rais’d desire,
And still we near and nearer prest,
And still our glowing lips would meet,
As if in kisses to expire.

And then those pensive eyes would close,
And bid their lids each other seek,
Veiling the azure orbs below;
While their long lashes’ darken’d gloss
Seem’d stealing o’er thy brilliant cheek,
Like raven’s plumage smooth’d on snow.

I dreamt last night our love return’d,
And, sooth to say, that very dream
Was sweeter in its phantasy,
Than if for other hearts I burn’d,
For eyes that ne’er like thine could beam
In Rapture’s wild reality.

Then tell me not, remind me not,
Of hours which, though for ever gone,
Can still a pleasing dream restore,
Till Thou and I shall be forgot,
And senseless, as the mouldering stone
Which tells that we shall be no more.

George Gordon Byron
(1788 – 1824)
Remind me not, remind me not
(Poem)

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Karel van de Woestijne: Gij draagt een schone vlechte haar… (Gedicht)

   

Gij draagt een schone vlechte haar…

Gij draagt een schone vlechte haar
allangs uw lage leên…
– Het is een trage dag voorwaar
van weiflen en van wenen.

Het is een lengende avond van
mis-troosten en mis-prijzen.
’t Is of de dag niet sterven kan
en of geen nacht kan grijzen…

– Gij gaat mijn duister huis voorbij,
verlangenloos en rechte;
ik rade uw naakte, magre dij;
ik zie uw donkre vlechte.

Karel van de Woestijne
(1878 – 1929)
Gij draagt een schone vlechte haar…

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Archive W-X, Woestijne, Karel van de


Victor Hugo: Le Poëte (Poème)

 

Le poëte

Shakspeare songe ; loin du Versaille éclatant,
Des buis taillés, des ifs peignés, où l’on entend
Gémir la tragédie éplorée et prolixe,
Il contemple la foule avec son regard fixe,
Et toute la forêt frissonne devant lui.
Pâle, il marche, au dedans de lui-même ébloui ;
Il va, farouche, fauve, et, comme une crinière,
Secouant sur sa tête un haillon de lumière.
Son crâne transparent est plein d’âmes, de corps,
De rêves, dont on voit la lueur du dehors ;
Le monde tout entier passe à travers son crible ;
Il tient toute la vie en son poignet terrible ;
Il fait sortir de l’homme un sanglot surhumain.
Dans ce génie étrange où l’on perd son chemin,
Comme dans une mer, notre esprit parfois sombre.
Nous sentons, frémissants, dans son théâtre sombre,
Passer sur nous le vent de sa bouche soufflant,
Et ses doigts nous ouvrir et nous fouiller le flanc.
Jamais il ne recule ; il est géant ; il dompte
Richard-Trois, léopard, Caliban, mastodonte ;
L’idéal est le vin que verse ce Bacchus.
Les sujets monstrueux qu’il a pris et vaincus
Râlent autour de lui, splendides ou difformes ;
Il étreint Lear, Brutus, Hamlet, êtres énormes,
Capulet, Montaigu, César, et, tour à tour,
Les stryges dans le bois, le spectre sur la tour ;
Et, même après Eschyle, effarant Melpomène,
Sinistre, ayant aux mains des lambeaux d’âme humaine,
De la chair d’Othello, des restes de Macbeth,
Dans son œuvre, du drame effrayant alphabet,
Il se repose ; ainsi le noir lion des jongles
S’endort dans l’antre immense avec du sang aux ongles.

Paris, avril 1835.

Victor Hugo
(1802-1885)
Le poëte
(Poème)
Les Contemplations

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive G-H, Archive G-H, Hugo, Victor, Victor Hugo


Lord Byron: It is the hour (Poem)

It is the hour

It is the hour when from the boughs
The nightingale’s high note is heard;
It is the hour — when lover’s vows
Seem sweet in every whisper’d word;
And gentle winds and waters near,
Make music to the lonely ear.
Each flower the dews have lightly wet,
And in the sky the stars are met,
And on the wave is deeper blue,
And on the leaf a browner hue,
And in the Heaven that clear obscure
So softly dark, and darkly pure,
That follows the decline of day
As twilight melts beneath the moon away.

George Gordon Byron
(1788 – 1824)
It is the hour
(Poem)

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Older Entries »

Thank you for reading FLEURSDUMAL.NL - magazine for art & literature