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Shelley, Percy Byssche

· Love’s Philosophy by Percy Bysshe Shelley · Anne Eekhout schrijft historische roman over Mary Shelley · Herman Melville: Shelley’s Vision (Poem) · Will Streets: Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916 (Poem) · Rachel Feder: Harvester of Hearts. Motherhood under the Sign of Frankenstein · Kathryn Harkup: Making the Monster. The Science Behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein · PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY: OZYMANDIAS OF EGYPT · Percy Bysshe Shelley: Good-night · Percy Bysshe Shelley: Good-night in een nieuwe vertaling van Cornelis W. Schoneveld · Percy Bysshe Shelley: Good-night · Percy Byssche Shelley: To Night (vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld) · Hans Hermans photos: To Night

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Love’s Philosophy by Percy Bysshe Shelley

 

Love’s Philosophy

The fountains mingle with the river
And the rivers with the Ocean,
The winds of Heaven mix for ever
With a sweet emotion;
Nothing in the world is single;
All things by a law divine
in one spirit meet and mingle.
Why not I with thine?-

See the mountains kiss high Heaven
And the waves clasp one another;
No sister-flower would be forgiven
If it disdained its brother;
And the sunlight clasps the earth
And the moonbeams kiss the sea:
What is all this sweet work worth
If thou kiss not me?

Percy Bysshe Shelley
(1792 – 1822)
Love’s Philosophy

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive S-T, Archive S-T, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Anne Eekhout schrijft historische roman over Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley verblijft op haar veertiende bij een familie in Schotland, waar een innige vriendschap ontstaat met Isabella Baxter.

Samen dwalen ze in het gebied dat al eeuwen verhalen herbergt over monsters en geesten, en op een dag stuiten ze diep in het bos op een man die geen man is. De ledematen log en lelijk, een hoofd dat noch menselijk, noch dierlijk is.

Vier jaar later brengt Mary met haar geliefde Percy Shelley een bezoek aan haar vrienden John Polidori en Lord Byron, bij het Meer van Genève. ’s Avonds bij het haardvuur vertellen ze elkaar verhalen. Een flintertje herinnering brengt haar terug naar haar tijd met Isabella in Schotland, en ook naar David Booth, een zeer intelligente, charismatische, maar tegelijk ook griezelige man, die een grote interesse in Mary en Isabella ontwikkelde. Dan dient ook het monster uit het bos zich weer aan, en vanuit die gedachte ontstaat haar verhaal over het monster van Frankenstein.

Mary is een ode aan de verbeelding, een verhaal over creëren, over de onlosmakelijke band tussen fantasie en werkelijkheid. En evenals Mary Shelley toont Anne Eekhout de kracht van een vrouw wanneer die iets ter wereld brengt wat niemand voor mogelijk had gehouden.

Anne Eekhout debuteerde in 2014 met de roman Dogma, die werd genomineerd voor de Bronzen Uil voor het beste debuut, op de longlist stond van de AKO Literatuurprijs en die wordt vertaald in het Duits. In 2016 verscheen Op een nacht (genomineerd voor de BNG Literatuurprijs) en in 2019 Nicolas en de verdwijning van de wereld, dat de prijs voor het Beste Boek voor Jongeren won. In november 2021 verschijnt de roman Mary waarin met verbluffende verbeeldingskracht de achttienjarige schepper van het meesterwerk Frankenstein tot leven wordt gewekt.

# new novel
Mary
Auteur: Anne Eekhout
Type: Gebonden
ISBN: 9789403153315
NUR: 301
Aantal pagina’s: 384
Uitgever: De Bezige Bij
Verschijningsdatum: 18-11-2021
Prijs: 24,99

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More in: #Biography Archives, - Book News, - Bookstores, Archive E-F, Archive S-T, Byron, Byron, Lord, Keats, Keats, John, Mary Shelley, Percy Byssche Shelley, Shelley, Shelley, Mary, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Herman Melville: Shelley’s Vision (Poem)

   

Shelley’s Vision

Wandering late by morning seas
When my heart with pain was low–
Hate the censor pelted me–
Deject I saw my shadow go.

In elf-caprice of bitter tone
I too would pelt the pelted one:
At my shadow I cast a stone.

When lo, upon that sun-lit ground
I saw the quivering phantom take
The likeness of St. Stephen crowned:
Then did self-reverence awake.

Herman Melville
(1819 – 1891)
Shelley’s Vision

•fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive M-N, Archive M-N, Archive S-T, Archive S-T, Herman Melville, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Will Streets: Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916 (Poem)

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Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916

Impressions are like winds; you feel their cool
Swift kiss upon the brow, yet know not where
They sprang to birth: so like a pool
Rippled by winds from out their forest lair
My soul was stir’d to life; its twilight fled;
There passed across its solitude a dream
That wing’d with supreme ecstasy did seem;
That gave the kiss of life to long-lost dead.

A lark trill’d in the blue: and suddenly
Upon the wings of his immortal ode
My soul rushed singing to the ether sky
And found in visions, dreams, its real abode –
I fled with Shelly, with the lark afar,
Unto the realms where the eternal are.

John William (Will) Streets
(1886 –1916)
Shelley in the Trenches 2nd May 1916
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More in: - Archive Tombeau de la jeunesse, Archive S-T, Shelley, Percy Byssche, Streets, Will, WAR & PEACE


Rachel Feder: Harvester of Hearts. Motherhood under the Sign of Frankenstein

In the period between 1815 and 1820, Mary Shelley wrote her most famous novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, as well as its companion piece, Mathilda, a tragic incest narrative that was confiscated by her father, William Godwin, and left unpublished until 1959. She also gave birth to four—and lost three—children.

In this hybrid text, Rachel Feder interprets Frankenstein and Mathilda within a series of provocative frameworks including Shelley’s experiences of motherhood and maternal loss, twentieth-century feminists’ interests in and attachments to Mary Shelley, and the critic’s own experiences of pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood.

Harvester of Hearts explores how Mary Shelley’s exchanges with her children—in utero, in birth, in life, and in death—infuse her literary creations. Drawing on the archives of feminist scholarship, Feder theorizes “elective affinities,” a term she borrows from Goethe to interrogate how the personal attachments of literary critics shape our sense of literary history.

Feder blurs the distinctions between intellectual, bodily, literary, and personal history, reanimating the classical feminist discourse on Frankenstein by stepping into the frame.

The result—at once an experimental book of literary criticism, a performative foray into feminist praxis, and a deeply personal lyric essay—not only locates Mary Shelley’s monsters within the folds of maternal identity but also illuminates the connections between the literary and the quotidian.

Rachel Feder is an assistant professor of English and literary arts at the University of Denver. Her scholarly and creative work has appeared in a range of publications including ELH, Studies in Romanticism, and a poetry chapbook from dancing girl press.

Rachel Feder (Author)
Harvester of Hearts
Motherhood under the Sign of Frankenstein
Cloth Text – $99.95
ISBN 978-0-8101-3753-0
Paper Text – $34.95
ISBN 978-0-8101-3752-3
August 2018
Women’s Studies
Literary Criticism
152 pages
Northwestern University Press

new books
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: - Book News, - Book Stories, Archive E-F, Archive S-T, Art & Literature News, Mary Shelley, Shelley, Mary, Shelley, Percy Byssche, Tales of Mystery & Imagination


Kathryn Harkup: Making the Monster. The Science Behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

The year 1818 saw the publication of one of the most influential science-fiction stories of all time.

Frankenstein: Or, Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley had a huge impact on gothic horror and science-fiction genres, and her creation has become part of our everyday culture, from cartoons to Hallowe’en costumes. Even the name ‘Frankenstein’ has become a by-word for evil scientists and dangerous experiments. How did a teenager with no formal education come up with the idea for an extraordinary novel such as Frankenstein?

Clues are dotted throughout Georgian science and popular culture. The years before the book’s publication saw huge advances in our understanding of the natural sciences, in areas such as electricity and physiology, for example. Sensational science demonstrations caught the imagination of the general public, while the newspapers were full of lurid tales of murderers and resurrectionists.

Making the Monster explores the scientific background behind Mary Shelley’s book. Is there any science fact behind the science fiction? And how might a real-life Victor Frankenstein have gone about creating his monster? From tales of volcanic eruptions, artificial life and chemical revolutions, to experimental surgery, ‘monsters’ and electrical experiments on human cadavers, Kathryn Harkup examines the science and scientists that influenced Shelley, and inspired her most famous creation.

Kathryn Harkup is a chemist and author. Kathryn completed a PhD then a postdoc at the University of York before realising that talking, writing and demonstrating science appealed far more than spending hours slaving over a hot fume-hood. Kathryn went on to run outreach in engineering, computing, physics and maths at the University of Surrey, which involved writing talks on science and engineering topics that would appeal to bored teenagers, and she is now a science communicator delivering talks and workshops on the quirky side of science.

Making the Monster
The Science Behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
By: Kathryn Harkup
Published: 08-02-2018
Format: Hardback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 304 pp
ISBN: 9781472933737
Imprint: Bloomsbury Sigma
Illustrations: 11 black and white illustrations
Dimensions: 216 x 135 mm
£16.99

new books
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More in: - Book News, Archive G-H, Archive S-T, Archive S-T, Art & Literature News, Mary Shelley, Natural history, Percy Byssche Shelley, Shelley, Mary, Shelley, Percy Byssche, Tales of Mystery & Imagination


PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY: OZYMANDIAS OF EGYPT

shelley21

Percy Bysshe Shelley
(1792-1822)

Ozymandias of Egypt

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert… Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shatter’d visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on those lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Percy Bysshe Shelley
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More in: Archive S-T, Archive S-T, Percy Byssche Shelley, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Percy Bysshe Shelley: Good-night

- shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1792 – 1822)

Good-night

 

Good-night? ah! no; the hour is ill

Which severs those it should unite;

Let us remain together still,

Then it will be good night.

 

How can I call the lone night good,

Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight?

Be it not said, thought, understood —

Then it will be — good night.

 

To hearts which near each other move

From evening close to morning light,

The night is good; because, my love,

They never say good-night.

 

Percy Bysshe Shelley poetry

• fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive S-T, Percy Byssche Shelley, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Percy Bysshe Shelley: Good-night in een nieuwe vertaling van Cornelis W. Schoneveld

Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1792-1822)

 

Good-night

Good-night? ah! no; the hour is ill

Which severs those it should unite;

Let us remain together still,

Then it will be good night.

 

How can I call the lone night good,

Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight?

Be it not said, thought, understood –

Then it will be — good night.

 

To hearts which near each other move

From evening close to morning light

The night is good, because, my love,

They never say good-night.

 

Slaap zacht

Slaap zacht? o nee, het uur valt zwaar

Dat binden moest wie scheiden wacht;

Verblijven wij steeds bij elkaar,

Dan wordt het pas: slaap zacht.

 

Hoe noem ik slapen  “zacht”, alleen,

Al steunt ’t zijn vlucht als jij ’t lief zegt?

Maar komt voor ’t zeggen, ’t wensen, geen

Moment, volgt slaap zacht echt.

 

Voor harten altijd dicht tesaam,

Van ’s avonds laat tot ’s morgens vroeg,

Is nachttijd, liefste, aangenaam

En slaap al zacht genoeg.

 

Vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld 2012

Percy Bysshe Shelley poetry

kempis.nl poetry magazine

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Percy Bysshe Shelley: Good-night

Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1792 – 1822)

Good-night

 

Good-night? ah! no; the hour is ill

Which severs those it should unite;

Let us remain together still,

Then it will be good night.

 

How can I call the lone night good,

Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight?

Be it not said, thought, understood —

Then it will be — good night.

 

To hearts which near each other move

From evening close to morning light,

The night is good; because, my love,

They never say good-night.

 

Percy Bysshe Shelley poetry

kempis.nl poetry magazine

More in: Archive S-T, Percy Byssche Shelley, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Percy Byssche Shelley: To Night (vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld)

Percy Byssche Shelley

(1792-1822)

 

To Night

Swiftly walk o’er the western wave,

Spirit of Night!

Out of the misty eastern cave,

Where, all the long and lone daylight,

Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear,

Which make thee terrible and dear, –

Swift be thy flight!

 

Wrap thy form in a mantle grey,

Star-inwrought!

Blind with thine hair the eyes of Day;

Kiss her until she be wearied out –

Then wander o’er city, and sea, and land,

Touching all with thine opiate wand –

Come, long-sought!

 

When I arose and saw the dawn,

I sighed for thee;

When light rode high, and the dew was gone,

And noon lay heavy on flower and tree,

And the weary Day turned to his rest,

Lingering like an unloved guest,

I sighed for thee.

 

Thy brother Death came, and cried,

Wouldst thou me?

Thy sweet child Sleep, the filmy-eyed,

Murmured like a noontide bee,

Shall I nestle near thy side?

Wouldst thou me? – And I replied,

No, not thee!

 

Death will come when thou art dead,

Soon, too soon –

Sleep will come when thou art fled;

Of neither would I ask the boon

I ask of thee belovèd Night –

Swift be thine approaching flight,

Come soon, soon!

1821

 

Percy Byssche Shelley

Aan de nacht

Jaag snel over de westgolf voort,

Geest van de Nacht!

Uit de mistgrot van ‘t oosters oord,

Waar, ‘t daglicht lang, jij eenzaam wacht,

En bange en blije dromen weeft,

Wat angst, en vriendschap, voor je geeft, –

Snel zij je jacht!

 

Neem ‘n mantel, grijs, met sterbeslag,

Sla hem om!

Blinddoek met j’ haardos eerst de Dag;

Kus haar dan moe, weerom en weerom –

Ga daarna stad, en land, en zeeën af,

‘t Al rakend met je opiumstaf –

Gezochte, kom!

 

Toen de ochtend gloorde voor mijn oog,

Gold jou mijn zucht;

Toen dauw weg was, en het daglicht hoog,

Toen ‘t groen leed door de middaglucht,

En toen moe de Dag zocht naar zijn rust,

Dralend als ‘n gast, lang weggekust,

Gold jou mijn zucht.

 

Je broer de Dood kwam, en vroeg,

“Zocht je mij?”

Je zoet kind Slaap, die ‘n oogfloers droeg,

Gonsde als een middagbij:

“Wou jij dat ik naast je sliep?

Zocht je mij?” – Waarop ik riep,

“Weg hier, jij!”

 

Dood komt na jouw laatste zucht,

Gauw, te gauw –

Slaap komt als jij bent gevlucht;

De gunst die ik nu vraag van jou

Vraag ik hun niet, geliefde Nacht –

Eindig hier gezwind je jacht,

Kom gauw, gauw!

 

Vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld

Uit: Bestorm mijn hart, de beste Engelse gedichten uit de 16e-19e eeuw gekozen en vertaald door Cornelis W. Schoneveld, tweetalige editie. Rainbow Essentials no. 55, Uitgeverij Maarten Muntinga, Amsterdam, 2008, 296 pp, € 9,95 ISBN: 9789041740588

Kempis.nl poetry magazine

More in: Archive S-T, Percy Byssche Shelley, Shelley, Shelley, Percy Byssche


Hans Hermans photos: To Night

Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1792-1822)


To Night


Swiftly walk o’er the western wave,
Spirit of Night!
Out of the misty eastern cave,
Where, all the long and lone daylight,
Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear,
Which make thee terrible and dear–
Swift be thy flight!

Wrap thy form in a mantle gray,
Star-inwrought!
Blind with thine hair the eyes of day;
Kiss her until she be wearied out,
Then wander o’er city, and sea, and land,
Touching all with thine opiate wand–
Come, long-sought!

When I arose and saw the dawn,
I sighed for thee;
When light rode high, and the dew was gone,
And noon lay heavy on flower and tree,
And the weary day turned to his rest,
Lingering like an unloved guest,
I sighed for thee.

Thy brother Death came, and cried,
Wouldst thou me?
Thy sweet child Sleep, the filmy-eyed,
Murmured like a noontide bee,
Shall I nestle near thy side?
Wouldst thou me?–And I replied,
No, not thee!

Death will come when thou art dead,
Soon, too soon–
Sleep will come when thou art fled;
Of neither would I ask the boon
I ask of thee, beloved Night–
Swift be thine approaching flight,
Come soon, soon!

Hans Hermans photos: To Night

Natuurdagboek Juni 2009

kemp=mag poetry magazine – magazine for art & literature

© hans hermans

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