New

  1. Antonin Artaud: Poète noir (Poème)
  2. Christian Metz: Poetisch denken. Die Lyrik der Gegenwart
  3. Wilfred Owen: A Terre (Poem)
  4. The Boy and The Bayonet by Paul Laurence Dunbar (Short story)
  5. Koos Meinderts: De schelmenstreken van Reinaert de Vos
  6. Ton van Reen: Het diepste blauw (086). Een roman als feuilleton
  7. August Stramm: Weltwehe (Gedicht)
  8. Bert Bevers: Verdwijnpunt (Gedicht)
  9. Carmen Sylva: Der Krieg (Gedicht)
  10. Gertrude Stein: A Poem About Waldberg
  11. Christian Kunda Mutoki: Guy de Maupassant. Une certaine idée de l’homme dans Le Horla
  12. The Race Question by Paul Laurence Dunbar (Short story)
  13. Chronicles of a Liquid Society by Umberto Eco
  14. Michel Houellebecq: Sérotonine. Roman
  15. Emily Dickinson: Wild nights – Wild nights!
  16. Sophie Albrecht: Sehnsucht (Gedicht)
  17. Saki: The Blind Spot (short story)
  18. Ton van Reen: Het diepste blauw (085). Een roman als feuilleton
  19. Antonin Artaud: Qui suis-je ? (Poème)
  20. Bert Bevers: Boodschapper (gedicht)
  21. Deathwatch by Jean Genet
  22. Emily Dickinson: The Outlet
  23. Gérard de Nerval: Les heures de la nuit – Poéme
  24. Yugoslavia: Peace, War, and Dissolution by Noam Chomsky
  25. David Lynch: Someone is in my House. Retrospectief in Bonnefantenmuseum
  26. Martin Rowson: Pastrami Faced Racist
  27. Sara Teasdale: The Look
  28. Hans Ebeling Koning: Vegetation
  29. The Annotated Prison Writings of Oscar Wilde
  30. Unwritten: Caribbean Poems After the First World War edited by Karen McCarthy Woolf
  31. August Stramm: Feuertaufe (Gedicht)
  32. Ton van Reen: Het diepste blauw (084). Een roman als feuilleton
  33. Norman Mailer: Four Books of the 1960s
  34. This is Not the End of the Book by Umberto Eco & Jean-Claude Carrière
  35. Oliver Sacks: Dankbaarheid. Essays
  36. Gerald Janecek: Everything Has Already Been Written. Moscow Conceptualist Poetry and Performance
  37. His Hands Were Gentle. Selected Lyrics of Victor Jara
  38. Gladys Cromwell: Transmission
  39. Stairs and Whispers: D/deaf and Disabled Poets Write Back
  40. Winternachten festival van 17 tot en met 20 januari 2019 in Den Haag
  41. Tentoonstelling Maartje Korstanje: Unexpected Guests
  42. BODY MATTERS: Anam Cara – Dwelling Body (performance opera) in Venice (It)
  43. Nieuwe publicatie van: PARK – platform for visual arts
  44. Ton van Reen: Het diepste blauw (083). Een roman als feuilleton
  45. Wilfred Owen poetry: The End
  46. Hugo Ball: Der Henker
  47. Monument: Poems New and Selected by Natasha Trethewey
  48. Gérard de Nerval: Pensée de Byron – Élégie
  49. Sibylla SCHWARZ: Ach, Amor, nimb dein schwäres Joch von mir
  50. In Her Own Words. The Life and Poetry of Aelia Eudocia by Brian P. Sowers

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Chronicles of a Liquid Society by Umberto Eco

The final book from one of Europe’s cultural giants: an entertaining collection of essays about the modern world – from unbridled individualism to mobile phones.

Umberto Eco was an international cultural superstar. A celebrated essayist as well as novelist, in this, his last collection, he explores many aspects of the modern world with irrepressible curiosity and wisdom written in his uniquely ironic voice.

Written by Eco as articles for his regular column in l’Espresso magazine, he brings his dazzling erudition, incisiveness and keen sense of the everyday to bear on topics such as popular culture and politics, unbridled individualism, conspiracies, the old and the young, mobile phones, mass media, racism, good manners and the crisis in ideological values.

It is a final gift to his readers – astute, witty and illuminating.

“ A swan song from one of Europe’s great intellectuals…Eco entertains with his intellect, humor, and insatiable curiosity…there’s much here to enjoy and ponder ”.  Tim Parks, Guardian

Chronicles of a Liquid Society
by Umberto Eco
Paperback
ISBN 9781784705206
Hardback
ISNB 9781911215318
2017/2018
Harvill Secker / Vintage
320 pages
Language & Literary Studies

# New books
Chronicles of a Liquid Society
by Umberto Eco

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Michel Houellebecq: Sérotonine. Roman

«Mes croyances sont limitées, mais elles sont violentes. Je crois à la possibilité du royaume restreint. Je crois à l’amour» écrivait récemment Michel Houellebecq.

Le narrateur de Sérotonine approuverait sans réserve. Son récit traverse une France qui piétine ses traditions, banalise ses villes, détruit ses campagnes au bord de la révolte. Il raconte sa vie d’ingénieur agronome, son amitié pour un aristocrate agriculteur (un inoubliable personnage de roman – son double inversé), l’échec des idéaux de leur jeunesse, l’espoir peut-être insensé de retrouver une femme perdue.

Ce roman sur les ravages d’un monde sans bonté, sans solidarité, aux mutations devenues incontrôlables, est aussi un roman sur le remords et le regret.

Michel Houellebecq
Sérotonine
Littérature française
Flammarion
À paraître le 04/01/2019
352 pages
139 x 210 mm
Broché
EAN : 9782081471757
ISBN : 9782081471757
€ 22,00

# Nouveau roman
Michel Houellebecq
Sérotonine

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Emily Dickinson: Wild nights – Wild nights!

 

Wild nights – Wild nights!

Wild nights – Wild nights!
Were I with thee
Wild nights should be
Our luxury!

Futile – the winds –
To a Heart in port –
Done with the Compass –
Done with the Chart!

Rowing in Eden –
Ah – the Sea!
Might I but moor – tonight –
In thee!

Emily Dickinson
(1830-1886)
Wild nights – Wild nights!

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Sophie Albrecht: Sehnsucht (Gedicht)

Sehnsucht

Entfernter Freund!
Um den auf immer
Im stillen Zimmer
Mein Auge weint;
Dann, wenn die Sterne
Am Himmel blinken,
Und Liebe winken,
Denk ich der Ferne
In der du, ach!
Jetzt um mich leidest,
Und Freuden meidest,
Mit Thränen nach.
Und wenn mein Freund
Im Stralenkleide,
Zu meinem Leide
Mitleidig scheint;

Da werf ich mich,
Mit stummen Sehnen
Und tausend Thränen –
O! sähst du mich!
An jene Flüsse
Zur Erde nieder,
Die unsre Lieder
Und unsere Küsse
Beym Sternenschein
So oft belauschten,
und sanfter rauschten
Durch diesen Hayn –
Ach! keine Lieder
Und keine Küsse,
Ihr – Hayn – und Flüsse!
Belauscht ihr wieder –
Und denk an dich,
An jene Zeiten,
So voller Freuden
Für mich und dich;

Dann ruf ich dich
Durch alle Wälder,
Durch Thal und Felder
Als hört’st du mich.
Und wüst und schaurig
Ist Hayn – und Trifte,
Wie Todtengrüfte,
So bang und traurig.
O! Mond und Sterne,
Blickt tausend Küsse
Und tausend Grüsse
Dem in der Ferne,
Ihr könnt’ ihn finden!
So ruf und weine
Ich oft alleine
In öden Gründen.
So lächelt dir
Der Mond oft Küsse
So traurig süsse
Mein Freund von mir.

Sophie Albrecht
(1757-1840)
Gedicht
Im Junius 1783

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Saki: The Blind Spot (short story)

The Blind Spot

“You’ve just come back from Adelaide’s funeral, haven’t you?” said Sir Lulworth to his nephew; “I suppose it was very like most other funerals?”

“I’ll tell you all about it at lunch,” said Egbert.

“You’ll do nothing of the sort. It wouldn’t be respectful either to your great-aunt’s memory or to the lunch. We begin with Spanish olives, then a borshch, then more olives and a bird of some kind, and a rather enticing Rhenish wine, not at all expensive as wines go in this country, but still quite laudable in its way. Now there’s absolutely nothing in that menu that harmonises in the least with the subject of your great-aunt Adelaide or her funeral. She was a charming woman, and quite as intelligent as she had any need to be, but somehow she always reminded me of an English cook’s idea of a Madras curry.”

“She used to say you were frivolous,” said Egbert. Something in his tone suggested that he rather endorsed the verdict.

“I believe I once considerably scandalised her by declaring that clear soup was a more important factor in life than a clear conscience. She had very little sense of proportion. By the way, she made you her principal heir, didn’t she?”

“Yes,” said Egbert, “and executor as well. It’s in that connection that I particularly want to speak to you.”

“Business is not my strong point at any time,” said Sir Lulworth, “and certainly not when we’re on the immediate threshold of lunch.”

“It isn’t exactly business,” explained Egbert, as he followed his uncle into the dining-room.

“It’s something rather serious. Very serious.”

“Then we can’t possibly speak about it now,” said Sir Lulworth; “no one could talk seriously during a borshch. A beautifully constructed borshch, such as you are going to experience presently, ought not only to banish conversation but almost to annihilate thought. Later on, when we arrive at the second stage of olives, I shall be quite ready to discuss that new book on Borrow, or, if you prefer it, the present situation in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg. But I absolutely decline to talk anything approaching business till we have finished with the bird.”

For the greater part of the meal Egbert sat in an abstracted silence, the silence of a man whose mind is focussed on one topic. When the coffee stage had been reached he launched himself suddenly athwart his uncle’s reminiscences of the Court of Luxemburg.

“I think I told you that great-aunt Adelaide had made me her executor. There wasn’t very much to be done in the way of legal matters, but I had to go through her papers.”

“That would be a fairly heavy task in itself. I should imagine there were reams of family letters.”

“Stacks of them, and most of them highly uninteresting. There was one packet, however, which I thought might repay a careful perusal. It was a bundle of correspondence from her brother Peter.”

“The Canon of tragic memory,” said Lulworth.

“Exactly, of tragic memory, as you say; a tragedy that has never been fathomed.”

“Probably the simplest explanation was the correct one,” said Sir Lulworth; “he slipped on the stone staircase and fractured his skull in falling.”

Egbert shook his head. “The medical evidence all went to prove that the blow on the head was struck by some one coming up behind him. A wound caused by violent contact with the steps could not possibly have been inflicted at that angle of the skull. They experimented with a dummy figure falling in every conceivable position.”

“But the motive?” exclaimed Sir Lulworth; “no one had any interest in doing away with him, and the number of people who destroy Canons of the Established Church for the mere fun of killing must be extremely limited. Of course there are individuals of weak mental balance who do that sort of thing, but they seldom conceal their handiwork; they are more generally inclined to parade it.”

“His cook was under suspicion,” said Egbert shortly.

“I know he was,” said Sir Lulworth, “simply because he was about the only person on the premises at the time of the tragedy. But could anything be sillier than trying to fasten a charge of murder on to Sebastien? He had nothing to gain, in fact, a good deal to lose, from the death of his employer. The Canon was paying him quite as good wages as I was able to offer him when I took him over into my service. I have since raised them to something a little more in accordance with his real worth, but at the time he was glad to find a new place without troubling about an increase of wages. People were fighting rather shy of him, and he had no friends in this country. No; if anyone in the world was interested in the prolonged life and unimpaired digestion of the Canon it would certainly be Sebastien.”

“People don’t always weigh the consequences of their rash acts,” said Egbert, “otherwise there would be very few murders committed. Sebastien is a man of hot temper.”

“He is a southerner,” admitted Sir Lulworth; “to be geographically exact I believe he hails from the French slopes of the Pyrenees. I took that into consideration when he nearly killed the gardener’s boy the other day for bringing him a spurious substitute for sorrel. One must always make allowances for origin and locality and early environment; ‘Tell me your longitude and I’ll know what latitude to allow you,’ is my motto.”

“There, you see,” said Egbert, “he nearly killed the gardener’s boy.”

“My dear Egbert, between nearly killing a gardener’s boy and altogether killing a Canon there is a wide difference. No doubt you have often felt a temporary desire to kill a gardener’s boy; you have never given way to it, and I respect you for your self-control. But I don’t suppose you have ever wanted to kill an octogenarian Canon. Besides, as far as we know, there had never been any quarrel or disagreement between the two men. The evidence at the inquest brought that out very clearly.”

“Ah!” said Egbert, with the air of a man coming at last into a deferred inheritance of conversational importance, “that is precisely what I want to speak to you about.”

He pushed away his coffee cup and drew a pocket-book from his inner breast-pocket. From the depths of the pocket-book he produced an envelope, and from the envelope he extracted a letter, closely written in a small, neat handwriting.

“One of the Canon’s numerous letters to Aunt Adelaide,” he explained, “written a few days before his death. Her memory was already failing when she received it, and I daresay she forgot the contents as soon as she had read it; otherwise, in the light of what subsequently happened, we should have heard something of this letter before now. If it had been produced at the inquest I fancy it would have made some difference in the course of affairs. The evidence, as you remarked just now, choked off suspicion against Sebastien by disclosing an utter absence of anything that could be considered a motive or provocation for the crime, if crime there was.”

“Oh, read the letter,” said Sir Lulworth impatiently.

“It’s a long rambling affair, like most of his letters in his later years,” said Egbert. “I’ll read the part that bears immediately on the mystery.

“‘I very much fear I shall have to get rid of Sebastien. He cooks divinely, but he has the temper of a fiend or an anthropoid ape, and I am really in bodily fear of him. We had a dispute the other day as to the correct sort of lunch to be served on Ash Wednesday, and I got so irritated and annoyed at his conceit and obstinacy that at last I threw a cupful of coffee in his face and called him at the same time an impudent jackanapes. Very little of the coffee went actually in his face, but I have never seen a human being show such deplorable lack of self-control. I laughed at the threat of killing me that he spluttered out in his rage, and thought the whole thing would blow over, but I have several times since caught him scowling and muttering in a highly unpleasant fashion, and lately I have fancied that he was dogging my footsteps about the grounds, particularly when I walk of an evening in the Italian Garden.’

“It was on the steps in the Italian Garden that the body was found,” commented Egbert, and resumed reading.

“‘I daresay the danger is imaginary; but I shall feel more at ease when he has quitted my service.’”

Egbert paused for a moment at the conclusion of the extract; then, as his uncle made no remark, he added: “If lack of motive was the only factor that saved Sebastien from prosecution I fancy this letter will put a different complexion on matters.”

“Have you shown it to anyone else?” asked Sir Lulworth, reaching out his hand for the incriminating piece of paper.

“No,” said Egbert, handing it across the table, “I thought I would tell you about it first. Heavens, what are you doing?”

Egbert’s voice rose almost to a scream. Sir Lulworth had flung the paper well and truly into the glowing centre of the grate. The small, neat handwriting shrivelled into black flaky nothingness.

“What on earth did you do that for?” gasped Egbert. “That letter was our one piece of evidence to connect Sebastien with the crime.”

“That is why I destroyed it,” said Sir Lulworth.

“But why should you want to shield him?” cried Egbert; “the man is a common murderer.”

“A common murderer, possibly, but a very uncommon cook.”

The Blind Spot
From ‘Beasts and Super-Beasts’
by Saki (H. H. Munro)
(1870 – 1916)

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Ton van Reen: Het diepste blauw (085). Een roman als feuilleton

`Als we China hebben gezien, zullen we pas begrijpen hoe nietig het hier allemaal is’, zegt Tijger.

`Hoe klein het dorp is, hoe smal de beek, hoe de fabriek stinkt.’

`Jij hoeft helemaal niet op reis te gaan om dat te ontdekken’, zegt Thija. `Jij weet het nu al.’

`Na de zomervakantie gaan we ieder naar een andere school’, zegt Tijger.

`Het is ellendig’, zegt Mels. `Ik wil helemaal niet naar een andere school. We moeten bij elkaar blijven.’

`We hebben er niets over te zeggen’, zegt Tijger. `Het is allemaal al beslist.’

`Stom’, zegt Thija. `Ik zal jullie maanden niet zien.’

`Dat is het ergst van alles,’ zegt Mels, `dat jij naar kostschool moet.’

`Ik wil het niet. Mijn váder wil het.’

`Ons vragen ze niets’, zegt Mels.

Ton van Reen: Het diepste blauw (085)
wordt vervolgd

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Antonin Artaud: Qui suis-je ? (Poème)


Qui suis-je ?

Qui suis-je ?
D’où je viens ?
Je suis Antonin Artaud
et que je le dise
comme je sais le dire
immédiatement
vous verrez mon corps actuel
voler en éclats
et se ramasser
sous dix mille aspects
notoires
un corps neuf
où vous ne pourrez
plus jamais
m’oublier.

 

Antonin Artaud
Poème
Qui suis-je ?
(1896 – 1948)

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Bert Bevers: Boodschapper (gedicht)

 

Boodschapper

Ze wegen door, die tafelen. Hij
sjouwt wat op en neer met
boodschappen en lijstjes met
benodigdheden: acaciahout,
gelooide huiden, getwijnd lijnwaad
en geitenhaar, onyxstenen, roodgeverfde
ramsvellen, zalfolie en o ja natuurlijk
brons en zilver niet te vergeten.
Want een beetje ark.

Groeiend tabernakel.
Nader niet te dicht,
bandeloos volk:
wacht tot de hoorn schalt.

Geloof

niet in goud

 

Bert Bevers
Gedicht: Boodschapper
Niet eerder verschenen

Bert Bevers is a poet and writer who lives and works in Antwerp (Be)
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Deathwatch by Jean Genet

Deathwatch, Jean Genet‘s earliest, shortest and most formally straightforward play, was first performed in Paris in 1949.

It retains an intense power and makes an excellent introduction to his later dramas – The Maids, The Balcony, The Blacks, The Screens. The French text of Deathwatch, published by Gallimard, was extensively altered by Genet during rehearsal; and Bernard Frechtman’s translation is of the final ‘performance’ version, which supersedes the original published text.Three convicts share a cramped prison cell.

There is no question as to which of them is the dominant dog in the pack: Green Eyes (Yeux-Verts) has brutally murdered a woman and is to be executed.

Lefranc and the younger novice-like Maurice are inside for less grave crimes. But both of them covet Green Eyes’ attention, baiting each other in the process, a duel that drives inexorably toward violence

Three young convicts share a cell. Locked into a world of dangerous rivalries, criminals Lefranc and Maurice compete for the attention of the charismatic condemned man, Green-Eyes.

Informed by his own experience in French prisons, Jean Genet’s first play, Deathwatch is an explosive exploration of the inversion of moral order.

Genet was one of the most prominent and provocative writers of the twentieth century.

Jean Genet’s Deathwatch premiered in this translation by David Rudkin with the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1987 and was revived at the Print Room, London, in April 2016.

Jean Genet was born in Paris in 1910. An illegitimate child who never knew his parents, he was abandoned to the Public Assistance Authorities. He was ten when he was sent to a reformatory for stealing; thereafter he spent time in the prisons of nearly every country he visited in thirty years of prowling through the European underworld. With ten convictions for theft in France to his credit he was, the eleventh time, condemned to life imprisonment. Eventually he was granted a pardon by President Auriol as a result of appeals from France’s leading artists and writers led by Jean Cocteau. His first novel, Our Lady of the Flowers, was written while he was in prison, followed by Miracle of the Rose, the autobiographical The Thief’s Journal, Querelle of Brest and Funeral Rites. He wrote six plays: The Balcony, The Blacks, The Screens, The Maids, Deathwatch and Splendid’s (the manuscript of which was rediscovered only in 1993). Jean Genet died in 1986.

Deathwatch
by Jean Genet
English
Translated by David Rudkin
Play
Faber & Faber
Paperback
64 pages
2016
ISBN 9780571332618
£9.99

# more books
Deathwatch by Jean Genet

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Emily Dickinson: The Outlet

The Outlet

My river runs to thee:
Blue sea, wilt welcome me?

My river waits reply.
Oh sea, look graciously!

I’ll fetch thee brooks
From spotted nooks,—

Say, sea,
Take me!

 

Emily Dickinson
(1830-1886)
The Outlet, 1860

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Gérard de Nerval: Les heures de la nuit – Poéme

 

Les heures de la nuit – Poéme

Nous sommes des Heures heureuses
Par qui le Plaisir est conduit;
Quand les étoiles amoureuses
Percent le voile de la nuit,
Près de la beauté qui repose,
Œil entr’ouvert, bouche mi-close,
Vers un lit parfumé de rose,
Nous guidons César et l’Amour.
Et, là, nous demeurons sans trêve
Jusqu’au moment où, comme un rêve,
L’Aube naissante nous enlève
Sur le premier rayon du jour.

Gérard de Nerval
(1808 – 1855)
Les heures de la nuit – Poéme

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Yugoslavia: Peace, War, and Dissolution by Noam Chomsky

The Balkans, in particular the turbulent ex-Yugoslav territory, have been among the most important world regions in Noam Chomsky’s political reflections and activism for decades.

His articles, public talks, and correspondence have provided a critical voice on political and social issues crucial not only to the region but the entire international community, including “humanitarian intervention,” the relevance of international law in today’s politics, media manipulations, and economic crisis as a means of political control.

This volume provides a comprehensive survey of virtually all of Chomsky’s texts and public talks that focus on the region of the former Yugoslavia, from the 1970s to the present. With numerous articles and interviews, this collection presents a wealth of materials appearing in book form for the first time along with reflections on events twenty-five years after the official end of communist Yugoslavia and the beginning of the war in Bosnia.

The book opens with a personal and wide-ranging preface by Andrej Grubačić that affirms the ongoing importance of Yugoslav history and identity, providing a context for understanding Yugoslavia as an experiment in self-management, antifascism, and mutlethnic coexistence.

Noam Chomsky (1928) is Institute Professor in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. A member of the American Academy of Science, he has published widely in both linguistics and current affairs. His books include At War with Asia, Towards a New Cold War, Fateful Triangle: The U. S., Israel and the Palestinians, Necessary Illusions, Hegemony or Survival, Deterring Democracy, Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy and Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media.

Title: Yugoslavia: Peace, War, and Dissolution
Author: Noam Chomsky
Edited by Davor Džalto
Preface by Andrej Grubačić
Subjects: Politics / History-Europe
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 978-1-62963-442-5
Published: 04/2018
Language: English
Format: Paperback
Size: 6×9
240 pages
$15.63

# new books
Noam Chomsky
Yugoslavia: Peace, War, and Dissolution

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