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George Orwell

· The longlist of The Orwell Prize for Books 2018 · Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell · LA GRANDE LIBRAIRIE: LES 20 LIVRES QUI ONT CHANGÉ VOTRE VIE · George Orwell: The Lesser Evil

The longlist of The Orwell Prize for Books 2018

 

The longlist of The Orwell Prize for Books 2018 features historical writing, fiction and for the first time a graphic novel.

The Islamic Enlightenment: The Modern Struggle Between Faith and Reason, Christopher de Bellaigue (Bodley Head). An absorbing account of the political and social reformations that transformed the lands of Islam in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries)

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People about Race, Reni Eddo-Lodge (Bloomsbury). A book on racial inequalities, exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race

Threads from the Refugee Crisis, Kate Evans (Verso). Combining the techniques of eyewitness reportage with the medium of comic-book storytelling, Evans has produced a compelling view into the life of asylum seekers living in Calais’s ‘Jungle’.

Testosterone Rex, Cordelia Fine (Icon Books). A book explaining why past and present sex roles are only serving suggestions for the future. It reveals a much more dynamic situation through an entertaining and well-documented exploration of the latest research that draws on evolutionary science, psychology, neuroscience, endocrinology, and philosophy.

The Road to Somewhere – The Populist Revolt and the Future of Politics, David Goodhart (Hurst Publishers). An exposition of how the political elites have failed their societies. This investigation into the new global politics reveals how the Somewhere backlash is a democratic response to the dominance of Anywhere interests, in everything from mass higher education to mass immigration.

What You Did Not Tell, Mark Mazower (Allen Lane). In the centenary of the Russian Revolution, What You Did Not Tell recounts a brand of socialism erased from memory – humanistic, impassioned, and broad-ranging in its sympathies. But it also explores the unexpected happiness that may await history’s losers, the power of friendship, and the love of place.

Poverty Safari, Darren McGarvey (Luath Press). People from deprived communities all across Britain feel misunderstood and unheard. Darren McGarvey, aka Loki, gives voice to their feelings and concerns, and anger that is spilling over.

Age of Anger: A History of the Present, Pankaj Mishra (Allen Lane). How can we explain the origins of the great wave of paranoid hatreds that seem inescapable in our close-knit world – from American ‘shooters’ and ISIS to Trump? Pankaj Mishra answers our bewilderment by casting his gaze back to the eighteenth century, before leading us to the present.

Bitch Doctrine, Laurie Penny (Bloomsbury) Bread for All:The Origins of the Welfare State, Chris Renwick (Allen Lane). This collection of Laurie Penny’s writing covers everything from the shock of Donald Trump’s election and the victories of the far right, to online harassment and the transgender rights movement. These darkly humorous articles provoke challenging conversations about the definitive social issues of today.

Winter, Ali Smith (Hamish Hamilton). In the second novel in her Seasonal cycle, Smith’s shape-shifting quartet of novels casts a merry eye over a bleak post-truth era with a story rooted in history, memory and warmth, its taproot deep in the evergreens: art, love, laughter.

Lovers and Strangers: An Immigrant History of Post-War Britain, Clair Wills (Allen Lane). Clair Wills’ book brings to life the incredible diversity and strangeness of the migrant experience. She introduces us to lovers, scroungers, dancers, homeowners, teaches, drinkers, carers and many more to show the opportunities and excitement as much as the humiliation and poverty that could be part of the new arrivals’ experience.

The judges for the Orwell Prize for Books are politician, academic and journalist Andrew Adonis (Chair), Literary Journalist and Artistic Director of Words and Literature of the Bath Festival, Alex Clark, author Kit de Waal, and Lorien Kite, Deputy Life & Arts Editor for the Financial Times.

The shortlist for The Orwell Prize for Books will be announced at The Bath Festival on 18th May. The winner of the £3000 prize will be unveiled on 25th June 2018 at The RSA, together with the winner of The Orwell Prize for Journalismand The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils.

Previous winners of the Orwell Prize for Books include John Bew for his biography of Clement Attlee (2017), Raja Shehadeh (2008), Alan Johnson (2014), and Andrea GiThe judges for the Orwell Prize for Booksllies (2010).

The Orwell Prize 2018 is for work published in the calendar year 2018. For more details and rules of entry please visit www.orwellfoundation.com

orwell-prize 2018
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: - Book Lovers, - Book News, Art & Literature News, Awards & Prizes, George Orwell, PRESS & PUBLISHING


Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

A firsthand account of the brutal conditions of the Spanish Civil War.

Homage to Catalonia is Orwell’s personal account of his observations in the Spanish Civil War. The book was first published in the United Kingdom in 1938.

In 1936, originally intending merely to report on the Spanish Civil War as a journalist, George Orwell found himself embroiled as a participant—as a member of the Workers’ Party of Marxist Unity.

Fighting against the Fascists, he described in painfully vivid and occasionally comic detail life in the trenches—with a “democratic army” composed of men with no ranks, no titles, and often no weapons—and his near fatal wounding. As the politics became tangled, Orwell was pulled into a heartbreaking conflict between his own personal ideals and the complicated realities of political power struggles.

Considered one of the finest works by a man V. S. Pritchett called “the wintry conscience of a generation,” Homage to Catalonia is both Orwell’s memoir of his experiences at the front and his tribute to those who died in what he called a fight for common decency. This edition features a new foreword by Adam Hochschild placing the war in greater context and discussing the evolution of Orwell’s views on the Spanish Civil War.

“One of Orwell’s very best books and perhaps the best book that exists on the Spanish Civil War.” — The New Yorker

George Orwell (1903-1950) served with the Imperial Police in Burma, fought with the Republicans during the Spanish Civil War, and was a member of the Home Guard and a writer for the BBC during World War II. He is the author of many works of non-fiction and fiction.

Homage to Catalonia
George Orwell
Penguin Classics
2013
256 Pages
£6.99
Paperback
ISBN10 0141393025
ISBN13 9780141393025

Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: - Book News, - Book Stories, Archive O-P, Art & Literature News, George Orwell, MUSEUM OF PUBLIC PROTEST- photos, texts, videos, street poetry, 1968, REPRESSION OF WRITERS, JOURNALISTS & ARTISTS, WAR & PEACE


LA GRANDE LIBRAIRIE: LES 20 LIVRES QUI ONT CHANGÉ VOTRE VIE

lagrandelibrairie01A l’occasion des 20 ans de France 5, l’émission “La grande librairie” a donne la parole: Un livre a-t-il changé votre vie ? Lequel ? Pourquoi ?

LES RESULTATS
LES 20 LIVRES QUI ONT CHANGÉ VOTRE VIE

Quels sont les livres qui ont changé votre vie ?

Voici le classement des 20 livres les plus cités à l’occasion de notre grand sondage auprès des téléspectateurs :

1   – “Le petit prince” – Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
2   – “L’étranger” – Albert Camus
3   – “Voyage au bout de la Nuit” – Louis-Ferdinand Céline
4   – “L’écume des jours” – Boris Vian
5   – “A la recherche du temps perdu” – Marcel Proust
6   – “Le Grand Meaulnes” – Alain Fournier
7   – “L’alchimiste” – Paulo Coelho
8   – “Belle du seigneur” – Albert Cohen
9   – “Cent ans de solitude” – Gabriel García Márquez
10 – “Les Fleurs du Mal” – Charles Baudelaire
11 – “La Peste” – Albert Camus
12 –  Harry Potter – J. K. Rowling
13 – “1984” – George Orwell
14 – “Le monde selon Garp” – John Irving
15 – “Crime et Châtiment” – Fiodor Dostoïevski
16 – “Le seigneur des Anneaux” – J.R.R. Tolkien
17 – “Le Parfum” – Patrick Süskind
18 – “Le journal d’Anne Frank” – Anne Frank
19 – “Madame Bovary” – Gustave Flaubert
20 – “Les Misérables” – Victor Hugo

petitprince

LGL, décembre 2014

# INFO website LA GRANDE LIBRAIRIE

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: - Book Lovers, - Book Stories, Art & Literature News, George Orwell


George Orwell: The Lesser Evil

George Orwell

(1903-1950)

 

The Lesser Evil

 

Empty as death and slow as pain

The days went by on leaden feet;

And parson’s week had come again

As I walked down the little street.

 

Without, the weary doves were calling,

The sun burned on the banks of mud;

Within, old maids were caterwauling

A dismal tale of thorns and blood.

 

I thought of all the church bells ringing

In towns that Christian folks were in;

I heard the godly maidens singing;

I turned into the house of sin.

 

The house of sin was dark & mean,

With dying flowers round the door;

They spat their betel juice between

The rotten bamboos of the floor.

 

Why did I come, the woman cried,

So seldom to her beds of ease?

When I was not, her spirit died,

And would I give her ten rupees.

 

The weeks went by, and many a day

That black-haired woman did implore

Me as I hurried on my way

To come more often than before.

 

The days went by like dead leaves falling

And parson’s week came round again.

Once more devout old maids were bawling

Their ugly rhymes of death and pain.

 

The woman waited for me there

As down the little street I trod;

And musing upon her oily hair,

I turned into the house of God.

 

KEMP=MAG # kempis.nl poetry magazine

More in: Archive O-P, Archive O-P, George Orwell


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