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Archive A-B

«« Previous page · Lord Byron: Growing Old · Pierre-Jean de Béranger: Le roi d’Yvetot · Hugo Ball: bfirr · Bert Bevers gedicht: Retour · Vincent Berquez: Rosa Parks · Pierre L.Th.A. Maréchal: Frans Babylon – herinneringsgewijs · Pierre-Jean de Béranger: Le petit homme gris · Aleksandr BLOK: Wat is het zwaar · Robert BURNS: Address to Edinburgh · Lord BYRON: Italy versus England · Aleksandr BLOK: Pieter slaapt · William BLAKE: The Sick Rose

»» there is more...

Lord Byron: Growing Old

Growing Old

But now at thirty years my hair is grey—
(I wonder what it will be like at forty ?
I thought of a peruke the other day—)
My heart is not much greener ; and, in short, I
Have squandered my whole summer while ’twas May,
And feel no more the spirit to retort ; I
Have spent my life, both interest and principal,
And deem not, what I deemed, my soul invincible.

No more—no more—Oh ! never more on me
The freshness of the heart can fall like dew,
Which out of all the lovely things we see
Extracts emotions beautiful and new ;
Hived in our bosoms like the bag o’ the bee.
Think’st thou the honey with those objects grew ?
Alas ! ’twas not in them, but in thy power
To double even the sweetness of a flower.

No more—no more—Oh! never more my heart,
Canst thou be my sole world, my universe !
Once all in all, but now a thing apart,
Thou canst not be my blessing or my curse :
The illusion’s gone for ever, and thou art
Insensible, I trust, but none the worse,
And in thy stead I’ve got a deal of judgement,
Thou Heaven knows how it ever found a lodgement.

My days of love are over ; me no more
The charms of maid, wife, and still less of widow,
Can make the fool of which they made before,—
In short, I must not lead the life I did do ;
The credulous hope of mutual minds is o’er,
The copious use of claret is forbid too,
So for a good old-gentlemanly vice,
I think I must take up with avarice.

Ambition was my idol, which was broken
Before the shrines of Sorrow, and of Pleasure ;
And the two last have left me many a token
O’er which reflection may be made at leisure :
Now, like Friar Bacon’s Brazen Head, I’ve spoken,
‘Time is, Time was, Time’s past’ : a chymic treasure
Is glittering Youth, which I have spent betimes—
My heart in passion, and my head on rhymes.

What is the end of Fame ? ’tis but to fill
A certain portion of uncertain paper :
Some liken it to climbing up a hill,
Whose summit, like all hills, is lost in vapour ;
For this men write, speak, preach, and heroes kill,
And bards burn what they call their ‘midnight taper’,
To have, when the original is dust,
A name, a wretched picture and worse bust.

What are the hopes of man ? Old Egypt’s King
Cheops erected the first Pyramid
And largest, thinking it was just the thing
To keep his memory whole, and mummy hid ;
But somebody or other rummaging,
Burglariously broke his coffin’s lid :
Let not a monument give you or me hopes,
Since not a pinch of dust remains of Cheops.

But I, being fond of true philosophy,
Say very often to myself, ‘Alas!
All things that have been born were born to die,
And flesh (which Death mows down to hay) is grass ;
You’ve passed your youth not so unpleasantly,
And if you had it o’er again—’twould pass—
So thank your stars that matters are no worse,
And read your Bible, sir, and mind your purse.’

Lord Byron (1788-1824)
Growing Old
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Pierre-Jean de Béranger: Le roi d’Yvetot

 

Pierre-Jean de Béranger
Le roi d’Yvetot

Il était un roi d’Yvetot
Peu connu dans l’histoire ;
Se levant tard, se couchant tôt,
Dormant fort bien sans gloire,
Et couronné par Jeanneton
D’un simple bonnet de coton,
Dit-on.
Oh ! oh ! oh ! oh ! ah ! ah ! ah ! ah !
Quel bon petit roi c’était là !
La, la.

Il faisait ses quatre repas
Dans son palais de chaume,
Et sur un âne, pas à pas,
Parcourait son royaume.
Joyeux, simple et croyant le bien,
Pour toute garde il n’avait rien
Qu’un chien.
Oh ! oh ! oh ! oh ! ah ! ah ! ah ! ah
Quel bon petit roi c’était là !
La, la.

Il n’avait de goût onéreux
Qu’une soif un peu vive ;
Mais en rendant son peuple heureux,
Il faut bien qu’un roi vive.
Lui-même, à table et sans suppôt,
Sur chaque muid levait un pot
D’impôt.
Oh ! oh !oh !oh ! ah ! ah ! ah ! ah !
Quel bon petit roi c’était là !
La, la.

Aux filles de bonnes maisons
Comme il avait su plaire,
Ses sujets avaient cent raisons
De le nommer leur père
D’ailleurs il ne levait de ban
Que pour tirer quatre fois l’an
Au blanc.
Oh ! oh ! oh ! oh ! ah ! ah ! ah ! ah !
Quel bon petit roi c’était là !
La, la.

Il n’agrandit point ses états,
Fut un voisin commode,
Et, modèle des potentats,
Prit le plaisir pour code.
Ce n’est que lorsqu’il expira
Que le peuple qui l’enterra
Pleura.
Oh ! oh ! oh ! oh ! ah ! ah ! ah ! ah !
Quel bon petit roi c’était là !
La, la.

On conserve encor le portrait
De ce digne et bon prince ;
C’est l’enseigne d’un cabaret
Fameux dans la province.
Les jours de fête, bien souvent,
La foule s’écrie en buvant
Devant :
Oh ! oh ! oh ! oh ! ah ! ah ! ah ! ah !
Quel bon petit roi c’était là !
La, la.

Chanson écrite en mai 1813.

Pierre-Jean de Béranger (1780-1857)
Le roi d’Yvetot
Toutes les chansons de Béranger (1843)

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Béranger, Pierre-Jean de, MUSIC


Hugo Ball: bfirr


bfirr

bfirr bfirr
ongog
rorr sss
dumpa
feif dirri
chu gaba
raur
ss

Hugo Ball
(1886-1927)
gedicht

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Ball, Hugo, Dada, DADA, Dadaïsme


Bert Bevers gedicht: Retour

Retour

De klokken roepen als vanouds maar er zijn minder oren.
Verduiveld goed nog weet hij hoe de superplie over het
schoon geschoren jongenshalsje schoof. In kalm ritme

vol geloof ging de dag in deze Heilig Hartkerk van start
als alle dagen. Naast de sacristie vertoeft zijn vingerafdruk
nog ergens op de knoppen voor het galmen. Medeplichtig.

Die jonge jaren raken meer en meer beduimeld,
maar tuimelen soms de draad van geheugen even
wichtig op. Dan proeft hij. Hoe vroeger een huis

waar hij nog wel eens langs kuierde thuis was,
langgeleden inzicht met hete huiver stolt
als ei in kokend water. Geen angst voor later.

Bert Bevers

 

Uit: Onaangepaste tijden,
Zinderend, Bergen op Zoom, 2006

Bert Bevers is a poet and writer who lives and works in Antwerp (Be)

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Bevers, Bert


Vincent Berquez: Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks

She told a big white man
a big no right in his face.
Nose to nose and quite scary
as if a lynching could result.
She didn’t flinch and said
she could’ve
and should’ve
be able to do this
one easy thing that day.
There she sat, little and grand,
and although she was the first
to sit on a bus in the white seats
she was bayed at as if this symbol
was like rejecting the public stocks.
This small piece of America
became everything,
a wave began and was unstoppable.
I don’t know much else about all this
but I am interested in my liberty.
She could have said it like that.

21.03.04

Vincent Berquez

 

Vincent Berquez is a London–based artist and poet

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Berquez, Vincent, Vincent Berquez


Pierre L.Th.A. Maréchal: Frans Babylon – herinneringsgewijs

Volgens Pierre Maréchal was de Brabantse dichter Frans Babylon een zieke poète maudit die zowel de poëzie als de kunst stimuleerde te vernieuwen. Brabant liep sterk achter bij de ontwikkelingen.

Uiteindelijk verwierp hij de traditionele dichtstijlen en schreef hij gedichten op gevoel. Met vrienden vormde hij de Bredero-club en stimuleerde hij kunstenaars om zich verder te ontwikkelen. Babylon bevorderde eveneens de ontwikkeling van openbare kunstexposities voor groot publiek.

Naast Brabant en Amsterdam was Frankrijk een geliefde omgeving. Ondanks zijn bipolaire stoornis en dankzij zijn creativiteit bracht Frans Babylon veel tot stand.

Pierre Maréchal werkte onder meer voor de internationale trekvogel-bescherming. Ruim twintig jaar is hij actief bezig met poëzie. Hij schrijft en organiseert maandelijks diverse podia en optredens. De laatste jaren doet hij dit bij de PoëzieClub Eindhoven en de werkgroep ‘Boekenkast’. Frans Babylon – herinneringsgewijs is typisch zo’n onderwerp. Het is een project over een bekende en tegelijk een minder bekende dichter, wiens daden van betekenis waren voor de ontwikkeling van de poëzie en de kunsten in het zuiden van ons land.

Pierre L.Th.A. Maréchal
Frans Babylon – herinneringsgewijs
Biografie Frans Babylon,
pseudoniem van Franciscus Gerardus Jozef Obers (1924 – 1968)
ISBN: 978-94-0223-720-7
Paperback 12,5 x 20 cm
186 pag. – 2017
€ 19,99

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: *Archive Les Poètes Maudits, - Archive Tombeau de la jeunesse, - Book News, Archive A-B, Archive A-B, Art & Literature News, Babylon, Frans, Brabantia Nostra, Frans Babylon


Pierre-Jean de Béranger: Le petit homme gris


Pierre-Jean de Béranger
Le petit homme gris

Il est un petit homme,
Tout habillé de gris,
Dans Paris ;
Joufflu comme une pomme,
Qui, sans un sou comptant,
Vit content,
Et dit : Moi, je m’en…
Et dit : Moi, je m’en…
Ma foi, moi, je m’en ris !
Oh ! qu’il est gai (bis),
Le petit homme gris !

A courir les fillettes,
A boire sans compter,
A chanter,
Il s’est couvert de dettes ;
Mais quant aux créanciers,
Aux huissiers,
Il dit : Moi, je m’en…
Il dit : Moi, je m’en…
Ma foi, moi, je m’en ris !
Oh ! qu’il est gai [bis),
Le petit homme gris !

Qu’il pleuve dans sa chambre,
Qu’il s’y couche le soir
Sans y voir ;
Qu’il lui faille en décembre
Souffler, faute de bois,
Dans ses doigts ;
Il dit : Moi, je m’en…
Il dit : Moi, je m’en…
Ma foi, moi, je m’en ris !
Oh ! qu’il est gai (bis),
Le petit homme gris !

Sa femme, assez gentille,
Fait payer ses atours
Aux amours :
Aussi plus elle brille,
Plus on le montre du doigt.
Il le voit,
Et dit : Moi, je m’en…
Et dit : Moi, je m’en…
Ma foi, moi, je m’en ris !
Oh ! qu’il est gai (bis),
Le petit homme gris !

Quand la goutte l’accable
Sur un lit délabré,
Le curé,
De la mort et du diable
Parle à ce moribond,
Qui répond :
Ma foi, moi, je m’en…
Ma foi, moi, je m’en…
Ma foi, moi, je m’en ris !
Oh ! qu’il est gai (bis),
Le petit homme gris !

Pierre-Jean de Béranger (1780-1857)
Le petit homme gris
Toutes les chansons de Béranger (1843)

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Béranger, Pierre-Jean de


Aleksandr BLOK: Wat is het zwaar

Aleksandr Blok
(1880–1921)

Wat is het zwaar

Ginds is een mens verbrand. (Fet)

Wat is het zwaar om hier op aard te zijn,
te doen alsof je niet al omgekomen bent,
steeds dit tragisch spel van angst en pijn
te zien voor wie het leven nog niet kent,

en steeds in boze dromen, nacht na nacht,
te vragen naar wat vragen niet verdraagt,
opdat hun in der schone kunsten pracht
de weerschijn van een vurig leven daagt!

 

Aleksandr Blok, Как тяжело ходить среди людей, 1910
Vertaling Paul Bezembinder 2016

Paul Bezembinder: zijn gedichten en vertalingen verschenen in verschillende (online) literaire tijdschriften. Zie meer op zijn website: www.paulbezembinder.nl

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Blok, Blok, Aleksandr


Robert BURNS: Address to Edinburgh

Robert Burns

Address to Edinburgh

1.
Edina! Scotia’s darling seat!
All hail thy palaces and tow’rs,
Where once, beneath a Monarch’s feet,
Sat Legislation’s sov’reign pow’rs :
From marking wildly-scatt’red flow’rs,
As on the banks of Ayr I stray’d,
And singing, lone, the ling’ring hours,
I shelter in thy honor’d shade.

2.
Here Wealth still swells the golden tide,
As busy Trade his labours plies ;
There Architecture’s noble pride
Bids elegance and splendour rise :
Here Justice, from her native skies,
High wields her balance and her rod ;
There Learning, with his eagle eyes,
Seeks Science in her coy abode.

3.
Thy sons, Edina, social, kind,
With open arms the stranger hail ;
Their views enlarg’d, their lib’ral mind,
Above the narrow, rural vale ;
Attentive still to Sorrow’s wail,
Or modest Merit’s silent claim :
And never may their sources fail!
And never Envy blot their name!

4.
Thy daughters bright thy walks adorn,
Gay as the gilded summer sky,
Sweet as the dewy, milk-white thorn,
Dear as the raptur’d thrill of joy!
Fair Burnet strikes th’ adoring eye,
Heav’n’s beauties on my fancy shine :
I see the Sire of Love on high,
And own His work indeed divine!

5.
There, watching high the least alarms,
Thy rough, rude fortress gleams afar ;
Like some bold vet’ran, grey in arms,
And mark’d with many a seamy scar :
The pond’rous wall and massy bar,
Grim-rising o’er the rugged rock,
Have oft withstood assailing war,
And oft repell’d th’ invader’s shock.

6.
With awe-stuck thought and pitying tears,
I view that noble, stately dome,
Where Scotia’s kings of other years,
Fam’d heroes! had their royal home :
Alas, how chang’d the times to come!
Their royal name low in the dust!
Their haplesss race wild-wand’ring roam!
Tho’ rigid Law cries out: ‘’Twas just!’

7.
Wild beats my heart to trace your steps,
Whose ancestors, in days of yore,
Thro’hostile ranks and ruin’d gaps
Old Scotia’s bloody lion bore:
Ev’n I, who sing in rustic lore,
Haply my sires have left their shed,
And fac’d grim Danger’s loudest roar,
Bold-following where your fathers led!

8.
Edine! Scotia’s darling seat!
All hail thy palaces and tow’rs ;
Where once, beneath a Monarch’s feet,
Sat Legislation’s sov’reign pow’rs :
From marking wildly-scatt’red flow’rs,
As on the banks of Ayr I stray’d,
And singing, lone, the ling’ring hours,
I shelter in thy honour’d shade.

Robert Burns (1759 – 1796)
Address to Edinburgh
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Burns, Robert


Lord BYRON: Italy versus England

Lord Byron
Italy versus England

With all its sinful doings, I must say,
That Italy’s a pleasant place to me,
Who love to see the sun shine every day,
And vines (not nailed to walls) from tree to tree
Festooned, much like the back scene of a play,
Or melodrame, which people flock to see,
When the first act is ended by a dance
In vineyards copied from the South of France.

I like on autumn evenings to ride out,
Without being forced to bid my groom be sure
My cloak is round his middle strapped about,
Because the skies are not the most secure ;
I know too that, if stopped upon my route,
Where the green alleys windingly allure,
Reeling with grapes red wagons choke the way.—
In England ’twould be dung, dust, or a dray.

I also like to dine on becaficas,
To see the sun set, sure he’ll rise to-morrow,
Not through a misty morning twinkling weak as
A drunken man’s dead eye in maudlin sorrow,
But with all Heaven to himself ; the day will break as
Beauteous as cloudless, nor be forced to borrow
That sort of farthing candlelight which glimmers
Where reeking London’s smoky cauldron simmers.

I love the language, that soft bastard Latin,
Which melts like kisses from a female mouth,
And sounds as if it should be writ on satin,
With syllables which breathe of the sweet South,
And gentle liquids gliding all so pat in,
That not a single accent seems uncouth,
Like our harsh northern whistling, grunting guttural,
Which we’re obliged to hiss, and spit, and sputter all.

I like the women too (forgive my folly!),
From the rich peasant cheek of ruddy bronze,
And large black eyes that flash on you a volley
Of rays that say a thousand things at once,
To the high Dama’s brow, more melancholy,
But clear, and with a wild and liquid glance,
Heart on her lips, and soul within her eyes,
Soft as her clime, and sunny as her skies.

Eve of the land which still is Paradise !
Italian Beauty ! didst thou not inspire
Raphael, who died in thy embrace, and vies
With all we know of Heaven, or can desire,
In what he had bequeathed us ?—in what guise,
Though flashing from the fervour of the lyre,
Would words described thy past and present glow,
While yet Canova can create below ?

‘England ! with all thy faults I love thee still’,
I said at Calais, and have not forgot it ;
I like to speak and lucubrate my fill ;
I like the government (but that is not it) ;
I like the freedom of the press and quill ;
I like the Habeas Corpus (when we’ve got it) ;
I like a Parliamentary debate,
Particularly when ’tis not too late ;

I like the taxes, when they’re not too many ;
I like a seacoal fire, when not too dear ;
I like a beef-steak, too, as well as any ;
Have no objection to a pot of beer ;
I like the weather,—when it is not rainy,
That is, I like two months of every year.
And so God save the Regent, Church, and King !
Which means that I like all and every thing.

Our standing army, and disbanded seamen,
Poor’s rate, Reform, my own, the nation’s debt,
Our little riots just to show we’re free men,
Our trifling bankruptcies in the Gazette,
Our cloudy climate, and our chilly women,
All these I can forgive, and those forget,
And greatly venerate our recent glories,
And wish they were not owing to the Tories.

Lord Byron (1788-1824)
Italy versus England
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Byron, Lord


Aleksandr BLOK: Pieter slaapt

Aleksandr Blok
(1880–1921)

Pieter slaapt

Pieter slaapt, in mist verzonken,
Lamplicht glinstert op de straat,
De Nevá weerspiegelt vonken
Van een verre dageraad.

In die verre gloed van morgen,
In de schijnsels van de nacht,
Houdt zich sluimerend verborgen
Hoeveel treurigheid mij wacht.

 

Aleksandr Blok, Город спит…, 1899
Vertaling Paul Bezembinder 2017

Paul Bezembinder studeerde theoretische natuurkunde in Nijmegen. In zijn poëzie zoekt hij in vooral klassieke versvormen en thema’s naar de balans tussen serieuze poëzie, pastiche en smartlap. Zijn gedichten (Nederlands) en vertalingen (Russisch-Nederlands) verschenen in verschillende (online) literaire tijdschriften. Voor­beelden van zijn werk zijn te vinden op zijn website, www.paulbezembinder.nl

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Blok, Blok, Aleksandr


William BLAKE: The Sick Rose

William Blake
The Sick Rose

O Rose thou art sick.
The invisible worm.
That flies in the night
In the howling storm:

Has found out thy bed
Of crimson joy:
And his dark secret love
Does thy life destroy.

William Blake (1757 – 1827)
Poem: The Sick Rose
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive A-B, Blake, William


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