In this category:

Or see the index

All categories

  1. CINEMA, RADIO & TV
  2. DANCE
  3. DICTIONARY OF IDEAS
  4. EXHIBITION – art, art history, photos, paintings, drawings, sculpture, ready-mades, video, performing arts, collages, gallery, etc.
  5. FICTION & NON-FICTION – books, booklovers, lit. history, biography, essays, translations, short stories, columns, literature: celtic, beat, travesty, war, dada & de stijl, drugs, dead poets
  6. FLEURSDUMAL POETRY LIBRARY – classic, modern, experimental & visual & sound poetry, poetry in translation, city poets, poetry archive, pre-raphaelites, editor's choice, etc.
  7. LITERARY NEWS & EVENTS – art & literature news, in memoriam, festivals, city-poets, writers in Residence
  8. MONTAIGNE
  9. MUSEUM OF LOST CONCEPTS – invisible poetry, conceptual writing, spurensicherung
  10. MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY – department of ravens & crows, birds of prey, riding a zebra
  11. MUSEUM OF PUBLIC PROTEST- photos, texts, videos, street poetry
  12. MUSIC
  13. PRESS & PUBLISHING
  14. REPRESSION OF WRITERS, JOURNALISTS & ARTISTS
  15. STORY ARCHIVE – olv van de veestraat, reading room, tales for fellow citizens
  16. STREET POETRY
  17. THEATRE
  18. TOMBEAU DE LA JEUNESSE – early death: writers, poets & artists who died young
  19. ULTIMATE LIBRARY – danse macabre, ex libris, grimm and others, fairy tales, the art of reading, tales of mystery & imagination, sherlock holmes theatre, erotic poetry, the ideal woman
  20. ·




  1. Subscribe to new material:
    RSS     ATOM

Wilde, Oscar

· Oscar WILDE: Les Silhouettes · Oscar WILDE: To My Wife · Oscar WILDE: Le Jardin Des Tuileries · Oscar WILDE: The Artist · OSCAR WILDE: The Doer of Good · Oscar Wilde – In naam van de schoonheid · Oscar Wilde: Flower of Love · Nieuwe vertalingen Oscar Wilde door Cornelis W. Schoneveld · Oscar Wilde: Flower of Love · Oscar Wilde: Pan. Double Villanelle. Nieuwe vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld · Oscar Wilde: The Grave of Keats (Vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld) · Oscar Wilde: Impression du Voyage (Vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld)

»» there is more...

Oscar WILDE: Les Silhouettes

fdm_oscarwilde2

Oscar Wilde
(1854 – 1900)

Les Silhouettes

The sea is flecked with bars of grey,
The dull dead wind is out of tune,
And like a withered leaf the moon
Is blown across the stormy bay.

Etched clear upon the pallid sand
Lies the black boat: a sailor boy
Clambers aboard in careless joy
With laughing face and gleaming hand.

And overhead the curlews cry,
Where through the dusky upland grass
The young brown-throated reapers pass,
Like silhouettes against the sky.

Oscar Wilde
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar WILDE: To My Wife

Oscar Wilde
To My Wife
 
I can write no stately proem
As a prelude to my lay;
From a poet to a poem
I would dare to say.
For if of these fallen petals
One to you seem fair,
Love will waft it till it settles
On your hair.
And when wind and winter harden
All the loveless land,
It will whisper of the garden,
You will understand.
 
And there is nothing left to do
But to kiss once again, and part,
Nay, there is nothing we should rue,
I have my beauty,-you your Art,
Nay, do not start,
One world was not enough for two
Like me and you.
 
Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900)
To my wife
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar WILDE: Le Jardin Des Tuileries

fdm_oscarwilde2

Oscar Wilde
(1854 – 1900)

Le Jardin Des Tuileries

This winter air is keen and cold,
And keen and cold this winter sun,
But round my chair the children run
Like little things of dancing gold.

Sometimes about the painted kiosk
The mimic soldiers strut and stride,
Sometimes the blue-eyed brigands hide
In the bleak tangles of the bosk.

And sometimes, while the old nurse cons
Her book, they steal across the square,
And launch their paper navies where
Huge Triton writhes in greenish bronze.

And now in mimic flight they flee,
And now they rush, a boisterous band –
And, tiny hand on tiny hand,
Climb up the black and leafless tree.

Ah! cruel tree! if I were you,
And children climbed me, for their sake
Though it be winter I would break
Into spring blossoms white and blue!

Oscar Wilde
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar WILDE: The Artist

fdm_oscarwilde3Oscar Wilde
(1854 – 1900)

The Artist

One evening there came into his soul the desire to fashion an image of The Pleasure that abideth for a Moment. And he went forth into the world to look for bronze. For he could only think in bronze.

But all the bronze of the whole world had disappeared, nor anywhere in the whole world was there any bronze to be found, save only the bronze of the image of The Sorrow that endureth for Ever.

Now this image he had himself, and with his own hands, fashioned, and had set it on the tomb of the one thing he had loved in life. On the tomb of the dead thing he had most loved had he set this image of his own fashioning, that it might serve as a sign of the love of man that dieth not, and a symbol of the sorrow of man that endureth for ever. And in the whole world there was no other bronze save the bronze of this image.

And he took the image he had fashioned, and set it in a great furnace, and gave it to the fire.

And out of the bronze of the image of The Sorrow that endureth for Ever he fashioned an image of The Pleasure that abideth for a Moment.

Oscar Wilde, 1894
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar, Wilde, Oscar


OSCAR WILDE: The Doer of Good

fdm_oscarwilde3Oscar Wilde
(1854 – 1900)

The Doer of Good

 

It was night-time and He was alone.

And He saw afar-off the walls of a round city and went towards the city.

And when He came near He heard within the city the tread of the feet of joy, and the laughter of the mouth of gladness and the loud noise of many lutes. And He knocked at the gate and certain of the gatekeepers opened to Him.

And He beheld a house that was of marble and had fair pillars of marble before it. The pillars were hung with garlands, and within and without there were torches of cedar. And He entered the house.

And when He had passed through the hall of chalcedony and the hall of jasper, and reached the long hall of feasting, He saw lying on a couch of sea-purple one whose hair was crowned with red roses and whose lips were red with wine.

And He went behind him and touched him on the shoulder and said to him, ‘Why do you live like this?’

And the young man turned round and recognised Him, and made answer and said, ‘But I was a leper once, and you healed me. How else should I live?’

And He passed out of the house and went again into the street.

And after a little while He saw one whose face and raiment were painted and whose feet were shod with pearls. And behind her came, slowly as a hunter, a young man who wore a cloak of two colours. Now the face of the woman was as the fair face of an idol, and the eyes of the young man were bright with lust.

And He followed swiftly and touched the hand of the young man and said to him, ‘Why do you look at this woman and in such wise?’

And the young man turned round and recognised Him and said, ‘But I was blind once, and you gave me sight. At what else should I look?’

And He ran forward and touched the painted raiment of the woman and said to her, ‘Is there no other way in which to walk save the way of sin?’

And the woman turned round and recognised Him, and laughed and said, ‘But you forgave me my sins, and the way is a pleasant way.

And He passed out of the city.

And when He had passed out of the city He saw seated by the roadside a young man who was weeping.

And He went towards him and touched the long locks of his hair and said to him, ‘Why are you weeping?’

And the young man looked up and recognised Him and made answer, ‘But I was dead once and you raised me from the dead. What else should I do but weep?’

 

Oscar Wilde, 1894
fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar Wilde – In naam van de schoonheid

oscar-wilde002Antheia symposium
Voorstraat 125 Dordrecht
25 oktober 2014
Oscar Wilde
In naam van de schoonheid

Op 15 oktober 2014 is het 160 jaar geleden dat Oscar Wilde geboren werd. Om dit te vieren wordt een symposium georganiseerd onder de titel: ‘Oscar Wilde – In naam van de schoonheid’. Een unieke ontmoeting tussen de filosofie en de kunst. Zijn eigenzinnige manier van denken over kunst staat hierbij in het middelpunt. Met zijn ogen kijken we naar de werken van andere kunstenaars in de vaste collectie van het Van Gogh Museum, zoals die van Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Camille Pisarro en Claude Monet. Edwin Becker (Van Gogh Museum) en Katja Rodenburg (Antheia) nemen u mee naar de fascinerende wereld van de filosofie en de esthetica, en de kunst van de tweede helft van de 19e eeuw en het fin-de-siècle.

De wereld is mijn podium door Katja Rodenburg
We ontmoeten Oscar Wilde op de belangrijkste momenten in zijn leven en werk. In woord en beeld volgen we zijn veelbelovende jaren in Oxford, zijn lezingentour in Amerika, zijn gedachten over mode en inrichting in Parijs en zijn triomf in de theaterwereld van London. De wereld is zijn podium. Totdat hij in de gevangenis in Reading terecht komt en daarna zijn laatste jaren als persona non grata in armoede in Parijs moet doorbrengen.

Geneviève als kind in gebedMet de blik van Oscar Wilde – verrassende werken uit de vaste collectie door Edwin Becker
Oscar Wilde was gefascineerd door begrippen als ‘eros en thanatos’ en Japonisme, en was uitstekend op de hoogte van eigentijdse kunst, zoals de werken van Pissarro en Monet, via onder meer zijn bezoeken aan galerie Durand-Ruel. Hij was ook verzot op het werk van bijvoorbeeld een proto-symbolist als Pierre Puvis de Chavannes. Verrassende kunstwerken uit de collectie van het Van Gogh Museum van Redon, Stuck, De Feure, Puvis de Chavannes, Gauguin en vele anderen zullen worden besproken met de blik en visie van Wilde.

De schoonheid van een nieuwe tijd door Katja Rodenburg
Zijn leven lang zoekt Oscar Wilde naar een nieuwe schoonheid. Wij volgen de ontwikkeling van zijn denken over kunst aan de hand van zijn belangrijkste inspiratiebronnen. In het begin is dat vooral het werk van de Engelse Pre-Raphealite schilders en dichters, en de kunstcritici Walter Pater en John Ruskin. Maar al gauw zijn dat de boeken van Franse schrijvers, zoals Charles Baudelaire en Théophile Gautier. Wat betekent nu precies ‘l ‘art pour l’art’?

Programma:
v.a. 10.00 Ontvangst en registratie
10.30 Inleiding Katja Rodenburg
11.30 Korte pauze
12.00 Lezing Katja Rodenburg
13.00 Lunch
14.00 Lezing Edwin Becker
15.00 In gesprek met de deelnemers, gelegenheid tot vragen stellen en discussie met Edwin Becker en Katja Rodenburg
15.40 Feestelijke herdenking
16.00 Afsluiting

Over de sprekers
Edwin Becker is Hoofdconservator Tentoonstellingen van het Van Gogh Museum en kunsthistoricus. Hij is verantwoordelijk voor diverse tentoonstellingen, over kunstenaars als bijvoorbeeld Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Egon Schiele, John Everett Millais en thema’s als Kunstenaarslijsten (In Perfect Harmony) , Art Nouveau: la Maison Bing of Naturalisme (Illusie en werkelijkheid). Hij verzorgde verschillende essays en artikelen voor zowel de bijbehorende catalogi als andere publicaties.

oscar-wilde001Katja Rodenburg is filosoof, leiderschaps -adviseur en tentoonstellingen-curator. Zij publiceerde onder andere Ik, Ophelia, over John Everett Millais en het werk van de fotografen Hellen van Meene, Rineke Dijkstra en Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin en Armando en de melancholie van het scheppen, over de filosofische achtergronden van het werk van de kunstenaar Armando.
Voor berichten en artikelen rond filosofie, kunst en leiderschap kijk op haar weblog ‘Antheia Blossoms’

Informatie en inschrijving
Entree: De entree voor het gehele programma van het symposium, de informatiemap, koffie en thee, uitgebreide lunch en feestelijke afsluiting, bedraagt € 85,- per persoon.

Inschrijving: U kunt zich inschrijven onder vermelding van uw adresgegevens en telefoonnummer via e-mail: katjarodenburg@antheia.nl of via telefoon: 06 38280926 en door het bedrag van € 85,- per persoon over te maken op rekeningnummer NL 21 TRIO 0197 6162 08 ten name van A.K. Rodenburg te Arnhem, onder vermelding van ‘Oscar Wilde Dordrecht’

# Zie ook weblog Antheia Blossoms

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Art & Literature News, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar Wilde: Flower of Love

- OscarWilde

Oscar Wilde

(1854 – 1900)

 

Flower of Love

 

Sweet, I blame you not, for mine the fault was, had I not been made of common

clay

I had climbed the higher heights unclimbed yet, seen the fuller air, the

larger day.

 

From the wildness of my wasted passion I had struck a better, clearer song,

Lit some lighter light of freer freedom, battled with some Hydra-headed wrong.

 

Had my lips been smitten into music by the kisses that but made them bleed,

You had walked with Bice and the angels on that verdant and enamelled meed.

 

I had trod the road which Dante treading saw the suns of seven circles shine,

Ay! perchance had seen the heavens opening, as they opened to the Florentine.

 

And the mighty nations would have crowned me, who am crownless now and without name,

And some orient dawn had found me kneeling on the threshold of the House of Fame.

 

I had sat within that marble circle where the oldest bard is as the young,

And the pipe is ever dropping honey, and the lyre’s strings are ever strung.

 

Keats had lifted up his hymeneal curls from out the poppy-seeded wine,

With ambrosial mouth had kissed my forehead, clasped the hand of noble love in mine.

 

And at springtide, when the apple-blossoms brush the burnished bosom of the dove,

Two young lovers lying in an orchard would have read the story of our love;

 

Would have read the legend of my passion, known the bitter secret of my heart,

Kissed as we have kissed, but never parted as we two are fated now to part.

 

For the crimson flower of our life is eaten by the cankerworm of truth,

And no hand can gather up the fallen withered petals of the rose of youth.

 

Yet I am not sorry that I loved you -ah! what else had I a boy to do? –

For the hungry teeth of time devour, and the silent-footed years pursue.

 

Rudderless, we drift athwart a tempest, and when once the storm of youth is past,

Without lyre, without lute or chorus, Death the silent pilot comes at last.

 

And within the grave there is no pleasure, for the blindworm battens on the root,

And Desire shudders into ashes, and the tree of Passion bears no fruit.

 

Ah! what else had I to do but love you? God’s own mother was less dear to me,

And less dear the Cytheraean rising like an argent lily from the sea.

 

I have made my choice, have lived my poems, and, though youth is gone in wasted days,

I have found the lover’s crown of myrtle better than the poet’s crown of bays.

 

Oscar Wilde poetry

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar


Nieuwe vertalingen Oscar Wilde door Cornelis W. Schoneveld

poetry04

Nieuwe vertalingen Oscar Wilde door Cornelis W. Schoneveld

Bij uitgeverij Liverse te Dordrecht is vorige week een vertaling van alle 90 korte gedichten van Oscar Wilde uitgekomen, van de hand van Cornelis W. Schoneveld. Wilde schreef ze voordat hij grote bekendheid kreeg als toneelschrijver. Hij gebruikte een grote verscheidenheid aan versvormen, welluidend toegepast, gepaard gaande aan een scala van onderwerpen. Zo worden zijn ongelukkige liefdeservaringen, met de be­roem­de schoonheid Lillie Langtree aandoenlijk verwoord in vele toonaarden. Hetzelfde geldt voor Wilde’s verwerking van de dood van zijn vader en zijn kleine zusje. Groot pleitbezorger van het “L’art pour l’art ” idee, en zeer goed thuis in het nieuwe Franse Impressionisme, laat hij zich door beide vaak inspireren in zijn kijk op het leven, zijn emoties, en de natuur. Ook Wilde’s grote kennis van de antieke wereld en mythologie opgedaan als briljant student Klassieke Talen in Oxford en tijdens zijn reizen naar Italië en Griekenland leveren hem veel dichtstof op.

schoneveld wilde

Vallend bloemblad – Oscar Wilde

ISBN 978-90-976982-97-7 € 17,95

De verzamelde korte gedichten (tweetalige uitgave), vertaald door Cornelis W. Schoneveld

In zijn gedichten slaat Oscar Wilde een geheel andere toon aan dan de personages in zijn hilarische blijspelen doen. Humor maakt plaats voor gevoel, snedigheid voor subtiele beschrijving, luchthartigheid voor persoonlijke betrokkenheid. Nooit eerder werden al zijn 90 korte gedichten in het Nederlands vertaald. Cornelis W. Schoneveld, die twee eerdere bloemlezingen op zijn naam heeft staan, volgt ook hier rijm en ritme steeds nauwkeurig. De vertalingen van deze oud-docent Engelse letterkunde aan de Leidse Universiteit ‘geven blijk van een groot gevoel voor beide talen en voor poëzie’ (Heinz Wallisch).

≡ website uitgeverij liverse

fleursdumal.nl magazine

More in: Wilde, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar Wilde: Flower of Love

Oscar Wilde

(1854 – 1900)

Flower of Love

 

Sweet, I blame you not, for mine the fault was, had I not been made of common

clay

I had climbed the higher heights unclimbed yet, seen the fuller air, the

larger day.

 

From the wildness of my wasted passion I had struck a better, clearer song,

Lit some lighter light of freer freedom, battled with some Hydra-headed wrong.

 

Had my lips been smitten into music by the kisses that but made them bleed,

You had walked with Bice and the angels on that verdant and enamelled meed.

 

I had trod the road which Dante treading saw the suns of seven circles shine,

Ay! perchance had seen the heavens opening, as they opened to the Florentine.

 

And the mighty nations would have crowned me, who am crownless now and without name,

And some orient dawn had found me kneeling on the threshold of the House of Fame.

 

I had sat within that marble circle where the oldest bard is as the young,

And the pipe is ever dropping honey, and the lyre’s strings are ever strung.

 

Keats had lifted up his hymeneal curls from out the poppy-seeded wine,

With ambrosial mouth had kissed my forehead, clasped the hand of noble love in mine.

 

And at springtide, when the apple-blossoms brush the burnished bosom of the dove,

Two young lovers lying in an orchard would have read the story of our love;

 

Would have read the legend of my passion, known the bitter secret of my heart,

Kissed as we have kissed, but never parted as we two are fated now to part.

 

For the crimson flower of our life is eaten by the cankerworm of truth,

And no hand can gather up the fallen withered petals of the rose of youth.

 

Yet I am not sorry that I loved you -ah! what else had I a boy to do? –

For the hungry teeth of time devour, and the silent-footed years pursue.

 

Rudderless, we drift athwart a tempest, and when once the storm of youth is past,

Without lyre, without lute or chorus, Death the silent pilot comes at last.

 

And within the grave there is no pleasure, for the blindworm battens on the root,

And Desire shudders into ashes, and the tree of Passion bears no fruit.

 

Ah! what else had I to do but love you? God’s own mother was less dear to me,

And less dear the Cytheraean rising like an argent lily from the sea.

 

I have made my choice, have lived my poems, and, though youth is gone in wasted days,

I have found the lover’s crown of myrtle better than the poet’s crown of bays.

 

Oscar Wilde poetry

kempis.nl poetry magazin

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar Wilde: Pan. Double Villanelle. Nieuwe vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld

OSCAR WILDE

(1854-1900)

 

Pan. Double Villanelle

I

O Goat-foot God of Arcady!

This modern world is grey and old,

And what remains to us of Thee?

 

No more the shepherd lads in glee

Throw apples at thy wattled fold,

O Goat-foot God of Arcady!

 

Nor through the laurels can one see

Thy soft brown limbs, thy beard of gold,

And what remains to us of Thee?

 

And dull and dead our Thames would be

For here the winds are chill and cold,

O goat-foot God of Arcady!

 

Then keep the tomb of Helice,

Thine olive-woods, thy vine-clad wold,

Ah what remains to us of Thee?

 

Though many an unsung elegy

Sleeps in the reeds our rivers hold,

O Goat-foot God of Arcady!

Ah, what remains to us of Thee?

 

II

Ah, leave the hills of Arcady,

Thy satyrs and their wanton play,

This modern world hath need of Thee.

 

No nymph or Faun indeed have we,

Faun and nymph are old and grey,

Ah, leave the hills of Arcady!

 

This is the land where Liberty

Lit grave-browed Milton on his way,

This modern world hath need of Thee!

 

A land of ancient chivalry

Where gentle Sidney saw the day,

Ah, leave the hills of Arcady!

 

This fierce sea-lion of the sea,

This England, lacks some stronger lay,

This modern world hath need of Thee!

 

Then blow some Trumpet loud and free,

And give thine oaten pipe away,

Ah leave the hills of Arcady!

This modern world hath need of Thee!

 

 

Pan. Villanella in tweevoud

I

O Herdersgod met bokkevoet!

De wereld is nu grijs en oud,

En is er iets dat jij nog doet?

 

Geen herder die jou blij ontmoet

En zich tot appelworp verstout,

O Herdersgod met bokkevoet!

 

Noch iemand die in ’t bos begroet

Jouw poot zacht, bruin, jouw baard van goud,

En is er iets dat jij nog doet?

 

De Theems zou dood zijn, zonder vloed,

Want hier zijn winden straf en koud,

O Herdersgod met bokkevoet!

 

Dus veins dat je Helice behoedt,

Je wijngaard, je olijvenwoud,

En is er iets dat jij nog doet?

 

Ofschoon veel treurzang men vermoedt

Die ’t riet van beken in zich houdt,

O Herdersgod met bokkevoet!

Is er ook iets dat jij nog doet?

 

II

Verlaat Arcadië toch gauw,

Waar men de satyrs stoeien ziet,

De nieuwe tijd heeft baat bij jou.

 

Geen Faun of nimf is hier in touw,

Want Faun en nimf gedijen niet,

Verlaat Arcadië toch gauw!

 

Dit land is aan zijn Vrijheid trouw,

Waar Milton’s ernst zich op verliet,

De nieuwe tijd heeft baat bij jou.

 

Een land dat Sidney dienen zou,

Dat oude ridderlijk gebied,

Verlaat Arcadië toch gauw!

 

Dit zeeleeuwland met scherpe klauw,

Dit Engeland vraagt sterker lied,

De nieuwe tijd heeft baat bij jou!.

 

Bazuin wat ieder horen zou,

Doe afstand van je herdersriet

Verlaat Arcadië toch gauw!

De nieuwe tijd heeft baat bij jou!

 

VALLEND BLOEMBLAD

Verzamelde korte gedichten van OSCAR WILDE

Vertaald door  Cornelis W. Schoneveld

tweetalige uitgave,  2012 (niet gepubliceerd)

kempis.nl poetry magazine

More in: Archive W-X, Wilde, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar Wilde: The Grave of Keats (Vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld)

Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900)

 

The Grave of Keats

(sonnet)

 

Rid of the world’s injustice, and his pain,

 He rests at last beneath God’s veil of blue:

 Taken from life when life and love were new

The youngest of the martyrs here is lain,

 

Fair as Sebastian, and as early slain.

 No cypress shades his grave, no funeral yew,

 But gentle violets weeping with the dew

Weave on his bones an ever-blossoming chain.

 

O proudest heart that broke for misery!

 O sweetest lips since those of Mitylene!

  O poet-painter of our English land!

 

  Thy name was writ in water – it shall stand:

 And tears like mine will keep thy memory green,

As Isabella did her Basil tree.

 

Rome

 

 

Oscar Wilde

Het graf van Keats

(sonnet)

In de nieuwe vertaling van Cornelis W. Schoneveld

 

Van ‘s werelds onrecht en zijn pijn bevrijd,

 Rust hij op ‘t laatst onder God’s hemelbaan:

 Uit liefde en leven, nieuw nog, heengegaan

Ligt hier de jongste lijder neergevlijd,

 

Schoon als Sebastiaan, even jong ook dood.

 Hier geeft cipres noch taxus schaduw af,

 Maar waar viooltjes wenen op zijn graf

Is zijn gebeente nooit van bloei ontbloot.

 

O hart vol trots dat brak door hoe het leed!

 O stem die ‘t zoetst sinds Mytylene’s is!

  O schilder-dichter van ons Engeland!

 

  Je schreef je naam in water-hij houdt stand:

 En ook mijn traan steunt jouw gedachtenis,

Zoals Isabella’s balsemkruid dat deed.

 

Rome

 

VALLEND BLOEMBLAD

Verzameling van 90 korte gedichten van OSCAR WILDE

Vertaald door Cornelis W. Schoneveld

tweetalige uitgave, 2011

ongepubliceerd

 

fleursdumal.nl nagazine

More in: John Keats, Keats, John, Wilde, Wilde, Oscar


Oscar Wilde: Impression du Voyage (Vertaling Cornelis W. Schoneveld)

Oscar Wilde
(1854-1900)

Impression du Voyage
(sonnet)

The sea was sapphire colored, and the sky
 Burned like a heated opal through the air,
 We hoisted sail; the wind was blowing fair
For the blue lands that to the eastward lie.

From the steep prow I marked with quickening eye
 Zakynthos, every olive grove and creek,
 Ithaca’s cliff, Lycaon’s snowy peak,
And all the flower-strewn hills of Arcady.

The flapping of the sail against the mast,
 The ripple of the water on the side,
  The ripple of girls’ laughter at the stern,

  The only sounds:- when ‘gan the West to burn,
 And a red sun upon the seas to ride,
I stood upon the soil of Greece at last!

Katakolo

 

Oscar Wilde
Reisimpressie
(sonnet)
In de nieuwe vertaling van Cornelis W. Schoneveld

Het zeevlak glom met een saffieren tint,
 De hemel stond als hete opaal in brand,
 De wind trok aan; we tuigden ‘t want,
Voor ‘t blauwe land dat oostwaarts zich bevindt.

Ik zag vanaf de hoogste stevenkant
 Zakynthos’ kreek en zijn olijventrots,
 Lycaon’s sneeuwtop en Ithaca’s rots,
En ‘t bloemenrijk Arcadisch heuvelland.

De fok die klapperend om de stag zich wond,
 Het water kabbelend voorlangs de boeg,
  De meisjes kwebbelend in de kajuit,

  Meer klonk er niet – dan brandde langzaam uit
 Een rode zon op zee, die ‘m westwaarts droeg,
Ik stond nu eindelijk op Griekse grond!

Katakolo

 

VALLEND BLOEMBLAD
Verzameling van 90 korte gedichten van OSCAR WILDE
Vertaald door Cornelis W. Schoneveld
tweetalige uitgave, 2011
ongepubliceerd

kempis.nl poetry magazine

More in: Wilde, Wilde, Oscar


Older Entries »

Thank you for reading FLEURSDUMAL.NL - magazine for art & literature