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FDM in London

«« Previous page · The art of Samuel Herbert · Samuel Herbert paintings · Tracey Emin: Love is what you want · Hayward Gallery London: Tracey Emin, Love is what you want · Exposition Vincent Berquez in Langham Gallery London · London’s greatest love story · Hans Hermans photos: Tower Bridge London · BBC Poetry Season on TV, on radio and online · Reading London 4 · In Search of Art: London 2008 · Reading London 3 · Reading London 2

»» there is more...

The art of Samuel Herbert

samuelherbert 005

Skulduggery. Oil on canvas, 150cm x 120cm

The art of Samuel Herbert

The art of Samuel Herbert is concerned with exploring what he describes as an ’empathetic moment’, whereby the viewer can make a connection with the people or scenes depicted in his paintings. His work confronts topics that have a resonating discomfort in contemporary British society, namely class and the inheritance of colonialism. Herbert has never sought to use these works as a platform for his own feelings on these issues but rather he makes paintings of images that exploit the gap between nostalgic recognition and revulsion at what is being depicted.

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The Gallery. Oil on canvas, 210cm x 160cm, 2004

Herbert employs a painterly language that references traditional figurative painting and photographic appropriation. The paintings themselves are executed in a monochrome palette and applied using a variety of implements (including his fingers) on a prepared, uncannily flat, canvas surface. The resulting works are closer to drawing with paint than traditional painting and can resemble academic under paintings.

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Arm Chair Heroes. Oil on canvas, 130cm x 120cm, 2003

Previous motifs have included fox hunting, private members’ clubs and various scenes from the British Empire. More recent work has sought to explore the appropriation of tribal art by early 20th century modernism. In these newer works Herbert has attempted to remove as many of the signifiers revealing the cultural origin of the source imagery as possible so as to raise questions in the audience’s mind as to the context and background of the figures depicted in his art. This removal of context is not a strategy for denying or obscuring the value of the cultural source but rather to open up a space for an audience to engage with a broader range of issues regarding identity, appropriation and empathy with the other.

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Powerhouse. Oil on canvas, 150cm x 120cm, 2008

© paintings samuel herbert

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Samuel Herbert paintings

The Awkward Squad, 2012 – Oil on canvas, 76cm x 61cm

SAMUEL HERBERT (1976)

Samuel Herbert was born in London in 1976. He studied painting at Wimbledon School of Art and gained an MA from Goldsmiths college. He has over a decade of exhibiting experience and in that time has had six solo shows and numerous group shows in galleries and museums across Britain and Europe. His work is represented in several important collections of contemporary art, most notably the Saatchi collection, London. Herbert lives and works in London and is programme leader for the foundation degree in fine art practice with K College, University of Kent.

Converse, 2012 – Oil on canvas, 60cm x 40cm

Troll, 2012 – Oil on canvas, 24cm x 30cm

Samuel Herbert (1976)

Contemporary Artist – CV

Born: London, 1976,

lives and works in London

Education

2001-2004 Goldsmiths College, MA Fine Art

1997-2000 Wimbledon School of Art, BA Fine Art, Painting

1995-1997 Newham College, Foundation Diploma in Art and Design

Solo Exhibitions

2008

The Cremation of care

Gone Tomorrow Gallery, London

May-June 2008

2007

The Heritage of Cain

ZINGERpresents, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

September-October 2007

Art Cologne

Vamiali’s Gallery at Cologne Art Fair, Germany, April 18-22,  2007

2006

Skulduggery

Gone Tomorrow Gallery, Bethnal Green, London, August 5-28, 2006

Alien Subjects

Vamiali’s Gallery, Athens, Greece. March 11 – April 22 2006

2005

Natives and Colonials

ZINGERpresents, The Netherlands, October 19 – November 26, 2005

Unforgiven

Bearspace, Deptford High Street, London SE8, March 31 – April 18 2005

Selected Group Exhibitions

2012

The Perfect Nude

The Gallery, University of the Arts Wimbledon London, UK,  January 12th-February 10th

Charlie Smith Gallery, London, UK, July 6th-July 28th

2011

Connection Point London

The Nunnery Gallery, London, UK, June 17th-July 17th

2010

Dawnbreakers

John Hansard Gallery, Southampton, UK, April 27-June 12

2009

In Their Own Words

End Gallery, Sheffield, UK,  Nov – Dec 2009

The Royal Republic

Master Piper Gallery, London,  May – June 2009

And Now?

Greek State Museum, Thessaloniki, Greece, Dec  17 – Feb  22

2008

Life is Only Half the Story,

Christchurch, Spitalfields, London, February 2008

2007

NADA Miami

ZINGERpresents, Miami, Florida Dec 5 – 9 Dec 2007

Late Night Ficition

Agisilaou 61A, Keramikos, Athens October 2007

Eau Sauvage II

Fieldgate Gallery, London E1,  May  18 – 10 June 2007

Those Quaint Moments of Distress

Montana Space, Berlin. March-April, 2007

Art Rotterdam

ZINGERpresents at Rotterdam art fair, the Netherlands, February 7-11, 2007

Salon Nouveau

Engholm Englehorn Gallery, Vienna, January  25 – March, 2007

2006

Crossing Borders

Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki, Greece, September – November  2006

Kamikaze Blossom

Fieldgate Gallery, 14 Fieldgate Street, London E1,  April – June 2006

Eau Sauvage

Lucy mackintosh Gallery,  Lausanne, Switzerland,  March – May 2006

2005

Hydrophobia II

ZINGERpresents, The Netherlands, December 14 – January 21, 2005-06

Artissima

Turin Artfair, Italy. Showing with Vamiali’s Gallery, 10-14 November 2005

‘When I lived in Modern Times’:  Archive, artefact, album.

Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Sunderland, September 16 – November 12  2005

Gigolo

The Trafalgar Hotel, Trafalgar Square, London SW1, February 11-March 13 2005

Sunset in Athens

Vamiali’s Gallery, Athens, Greece, February 5-March 13 2005

Insurgence (Art Projects area, London Art Fair 2005)

Business Design Centre, Islington N1, January  18-23,  2005

2004

Revolution

Mare Street Studios, Hackney, London E8, October 17-24,  2004

Bonequake

16 Upper Wimpole Street, London W1, October 14-19, 2004

Goldsmiths Postgraduate Show 2004

Goldsmiths College, New Cross, London, July  22-26, 2004

Cinderella

Tower Bridge Business Complex, Bermondsey, London, July  16-31, 2004

The Solar Anus

Henry Peacock Gallery, London W1,  May  28 – July 3, 2004

Ready, Steady, GO!

Three Colts Gallery, Bethnal Green, London E2,  April 17 – May  1  2004

2003

Godzilla

2-10 Hertford Road, London N1,  25  October- 9 November 2003

2002

Work, Rest and Play

3-5  Leighton Place, London. 13-17  December 2002

Goldsmiths Postgraduate Show

Goldsmiths College London,  July 2002,  Postgraduate Diploma Show

Media/Collections

Collections

The Saatchi Collection, London

Various private collections in the UK,  Europe,  Asia and  the USA

Media

Audio Visual Interviews

Television

Working Lunch, BBC 2,  Feature on Art Fairs,  Broadcast  22/10/04  12.30-13.30

The Week, ITV1 (LWT), Feature on the Turner Prize, Broadcast 24/10/04 12.45-13.15

Radio

In Business, ‘Framed’  BBC Radio 4, Broadcast  3/2/05  20.30-21.00 and  6/2/05  21.30-22.00′

Printed Media

Articles and Reviews

Contemporary, Annual 2007,  p. 118-119

Timeout London (review) Martin Coomer, August 15  2006

De Telegraaf., National newspaper the Netherlands  14/2/06

‘When I lived in Modern Times’: Archive, artefact, album. ’Essay accompanying the exhibition by Alistair Robinson, Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art,  Sept 2005.

Metro (north East)  Review of Sunderland show,  p.32  12/10/05

Metro (London), ‘Metro Life- London for Free’ p.25  Thursday 31/3/05

The Art Newspaper (International Edition) Judith Bumpus, Photo of work and discussion p.36 No 156, March 2005

The Independent,‘Save and Spend’p.5  Saturday 14/1/05

Scratch Band, 2012 – Oil on canvas, 80cm x 60cm

≡ Website Samuel Herbert

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Tracey Emin: Love is what you want

Hayward Gallery London

TRACEY EMIN

Love is what you want

until August 29, 2011

Tracey Emin is one of Britain’s most celebrated contemporary artists. This major survey exhibition covers every period of her career, revealing facets of the artist and her work that are often overlooked. The exhibition features painting, drawing, photography, textiles, video and sculpture, in works that are by turns tough, romantic, desperate, angry, funny and full of longing. Seldom-seen early works and recent large-scale installations are shown together with a new series of outdoor sculptures created especially for the Hayward Gallery.

Since the early 1990s, Emin (b.1963) has used her own life as the starting point for her art, exposing the most harrowing and intimate details of her personal history. Sometimes confrontational or sexually provocative, her work resonates with the ‘personal political’ legacy of feminist art while at the same time speaking to relationships in general. Disarmingly frank and yet often profoundly private, much of Emin’s art – as this show makes clear – is also animated by her playful and ironic wit.

This show features works containing explicit images and words. Under-16s must be accompanied by an adult.

BLANKETS

Tracey Emin’s large appliquéd blankets overflow with words and phrases and are collaged from fabrics that have special meaning for her. The complex arrangement of applied letters and inscriptions has analogies with news design, with headlines and patches of handwritten texts spread across the work like print on a newspaper page. Reminiscent of banners paraded in religious, civic and political processions, Emin’s blankets contain many different voices, with topics ranging from incidents in her own life to concerns with events in the wider world.

NEONS

Tracey Emin uses neon to illuminate emotions, memories, feelings and ideas in graphic messages, sentences and poems. While neon has its seedy connotations, Emin finds it sexy: ‘It’s spangly, it’s pulsating. It’s out there, it’s vibrant.’ Translating handwriting and drawings into blown and bent neon tubing presents technical challenges,and the choice of words or images is crucial: ‘Not everything warrants being made in neon. It has to be specific. Neon is light, so, can you live with this thing glowing and the chemicals moving all the time?’

FILMS

Tracey Emin’s narratives and fantasies sometimes find their most appropriate expression in film. Mostly made in low-tech formats, their content veers from tragedy to comedy, from candid documentary to absurd flights of fancy. In How It Feels (1996) she recounts the details of a botched abortion and its physical and emotional aftermath, while in Love is a Strange Thing she is propositioned by a drooling dog. Her home town of Margate, and Cyprus, where her father is from, are locations for other short films about rites of passage in which music plays a prominent part.

MEMORABILIA

Tracey Emin’s family and friends are celebrated in many of her works. They often feature in assemblages that combine objects and ephemera along with handwritten texts. These narratives speak directly about their subjects – her maternal grandmother, her father – and the relics displayed. The earliest of them formed a ‘Wall of Memorabilia’ in her first solo exhibition, My Major Retrospective, in 1993. In 2003, Emin returned to using memorabilia in her art. Her exhibition Menphis featured framed ephemera and text memorialising different moments in her life, from childhood to adulthood.

DRAWINGS

Tracey Emin’s drawings are the mainstay of her art. They are in fact monoprints, a technique which involves drawing in reverse, through the back of the paper. Emin likes it ‘because you never know what the print’s going to be like when you turn it over.’ Her characteristic graphic line finds its expression in almost every medium she uses, including needlework. She explains that ‘through my embroideries, the line I draw is accentuated and extreme, which complements the way that I think.’

PAINTINGS

Tracey Emin describes her intimate, small-scale paintings as both ‘pretty and hard-core’. Though the subject is the artist herself, these more or less abstracted, often faceless images portray states of mind rather than physical likenesses. Admitting that she confronts herself with ‘apprehension and fear’, Emin goes on to say: ‘I try to detach myself from what I’m looking at, but at the same time I know exactly what I’m looking at. I’m looking at me in the most intimate way, which I don’t really want to look at or really think about, but try to come to terms with.’

SCULPTURE

‘I want to make sculptures that look like they’ve just landed,’ Tracey Emin has said. ‘Something conjured from my imagination.’ She makes sculpture in many media, but has a special affection for wooden structures: ‘Wood can be really grand, but it can also be small and intimate. Wood can be weathered, it’s got a history.’ Knowing My Enemy (2002), a partially-collapsed pier with a hut at its end, pays homage to her father. Other sculptures in the exhibition reflect the everyday tensions of love, or evoke disparate, dysfunctional families.

WRITING

Tracey Emin has said that writing is the backbone of everything she does. ‘I’m not known as a text-based artist, but I should be really,’ she points out. ‘It’s my words that actually make my art quite unique.’ Lettering and handwritten texts take centre stage in her blankets, neons and memorabilia works and act as voiceovers in her graphic art, while spoken narratives are a feature of her films and videos. A published author and newspaper columnist, Emin makes direct and powerful statements and observations, tells stories, plays with language, and writes poems and love letters.

Southbank Centre/Hayward Gallery London

TRACEY EMIN

Love is what you want

≡  Website southbank centre Hayward Gallery

fleursdumal.nl magazine

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Hayward Gallery London: Tracey Emin, Love is what you want

Hayward Gallery London

TRACEY EMIN

Love is what you want

until August 29, 2011

Tracey Emin is one of Britain’s most celebrated contemporary artists. This major survey exhibition covers every period of her career, revealing facets of the artist and her work that are often overlooked. The exhibition features painting, drawing, photography, textiles, video and sculpture, in works that are by turns tough, romantic, desperate, angry, funny and full of longing. Seldom-seen early works and recent large-scale installations are shown together with a new series of outdoor sculptures created especially for the Hayward Gallery.

Since the early 1990s, Emin (b.1963) has used her own life as the starting point for her art, exposing the most harrowing and intimate details of her personal history. Sometimes confrontational or sexually provocative, her work resonates with the ‘personal political’ legacy of feminist art while at the same time speaking to relationships in general. Disarmingly frank and yet often profoundly private, much of Emin’s art – as this show makes clear – is also animated by her playful and ironic wit.

This show features works containing explicit images and words. Under-16s must be accompanied by an adult.

Southbank Centre/Hayward Gallery London

TRACEY EMIN,  Love is what you want

√  Website southbank centre Hayward Gallery

fleursdumal.nl magazine

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Exposition Vincent Berquez in Langham Gallery London

Exposition Vincent Berquez in Langham Gallery London

VINCENT BERQUEZ

NEW WORKS

7-20 February 2011

Langham Gallery
34 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London, WC1N 3LE

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London’s greatest love story

Street poetry: London’s greatest love story

Kempis, London 2010

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Hans Hermans photos: Tower Bridge London

Rudyard Kipling

(1865-1936)

The River’s Tale

Prehistoric

Twenty bridges from Tower to Kew–
(Twenty bridges or twenty-two)–
Wanted to know what the River knew,
For they were young, and the Thames was old
And this is the tale that River told:–

"I walk my beat before London Town,
Five hours up and seven down.
Up I go till I end my run
At Tide-end-town, which is Teddington.
Down I come with the mud in my hands
And plaster it over the Maplin Sands.
But I’d have you know that these waters of mine
Were once a branch of the River Rhine,
When hundreds of miles to the East I went
And England was joined to the Continent.

"I remember the bat-winged lizard-birds,
The Age of Ice and the mammoth herds,
And the giant tigers that stalked them down
Through Regent’s Park into Camden Town.
And I remember like yesterday
The earliest Cockney who came my way,
When he pushed through the forest that lined the Strand,
With paint on his face and a club in his hand.
He was death to feather and fin and fur.
He trapped my beavers at Westminster.
He netted my salmon, he hunted my deer,
He killed my heron off Lambeth Pier.
He fought his neighbour with axes and swords,
Flint or bronze, at my upper fords,
While down at Greenwich, for slaves and tin,
The tall Phoenician ships stole in,
And North Sea war-boats, painted and gay,
Flashed like dragon-flies, Erith way;
And Norseman and Negro and Gaul and Greek
Drank with the Britons in Barking Creek,
And life was gay, and the world was new,
And I was a mile across at Kew!
But the Roman came with a heavy hand,
And bridged and roaded and ruled the land,
And the Roman left and the Danes blew in–
And that’s where your history-books begin!"

Hans Hermans photos

Poem Rudyard Kipling

kempis poetry magazine 

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BBC Poetry Season on TV, on radio and online

 BBC POETRY SEASON

on TV, on radio and online


Spring 2009 sees the launch of

a landmark commitment to the arts

with a pan-BBC season dedicated to poetry


Some of the nation’s best loved poets and celebrities will take part in a season of big, bold content across television, radio and online; exploring the far-reaching, compelling and truly fascinating world of poetry.

Griff Rhys Jones launches the Poetry Season on BBC Two on 20 May at 9.00pm with a passionate plea about Why Poetry Matters – how verse has the power to move and why everybody needs it.

Also on BBC Two, My Life In Verse With… Robert Webb is the first in a four-part series exploring the rich terrain of poetry from Milton to Shakespeare through the eyes of four well-known personalities also including Sheila Hancock, Malorie Blackman and Cerys Mathews; and Off By Heart on Friday 22 May at 9.00pm follows primary school children across the country as they take part in a nationwide recitation competition, culminating in a grand final, compered by Jeremy Paxman.

BBC Four features an enlightening six-part series, A Poet’s Guide To Britain, presented by Owen Sheers, (Mondays, 8.30pm), which explores six great works about the British landscape; and Ian Hislop welcomes the new Poet Laureate in Ian Hislop Changing Of The Bard – featuring an entertaining history of one of the oldest and, he argues, oddest offices in the British establishment on 16 May at 10.00pm.

Also on BBC Four poet Simon Armitage goes in search of one of the jewels in the crown of British poetry, Sir Gawain, and historian Michael Wood returns to his first great love – the Anglo Saxon world – to reveal the origins of our literary heritage in Michael Wood On Beowulf.

BBC Radio 3 and BBC Radio 4 will mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Alfred Lord Tennyson, while The Essay – A Laureate’s Life, also on Radio 3, offers five personal takes on the role of Poet Laureate from around the world. Radio 4 will showcase its second Poetry Slam competition following on from its hit 2007 contest.

For younger viewers CBeebies cooks up a fresh, daily serving of scrummy Poetry Pie in a specially created new series for three to six year olds. Starting on BBC Two on May 18 poets from Brian Patten, Roger McGough and Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen to primary school pupils from across the UK contribute to a mix of funny and original rhythms and rhymes.

A dedicated website, bbc.co.uk/poetryseason, launching on 18 May, will feature a wealth of content including a vote to elect the Nation’s Favourite Poet, with short films from a host of celebrities making their case for their favourite poet including John Sergeant on Betjeman and Alex James on Auden. Plus the Poetry Season’s dedicated website will feature a poetry search engine to find poems according to a particular theme or mood.

George Entwistle, Controller Knowledge Commissioning, BBC Vision, says: “The Poetry Season offers viewers a fascinating and accessible insight into verse; there really is something for everyone.

“The UK has an extraordinary poetic tradition. We hope this season, the BBC’s fantastic accompanying online offering, and the other initiatives with the likes of the Poetry Society will inspire and motivate people to discover and reacquaint themselves with the poetry greats. In addition it may also inspire them to discover their own poetic voice.”

The BBC is working closely with external partners on the season including the Poetry Society and National Poetry Day.

BBC WEBSITE:  bbc.co.uk/poetryseason

 

BBC Two

Why Poetry Matters, 20 May at 9.00pm (1×60)

Griff Rhys Jones launches the BBC’s Poetry Season with a passionate and personal plea about why poetry matters – how verse has the power to move, and why everybody needs it. Within this witty, stylish, high-impact hour, Griff makes the case that poetry is accessible, enjoyable and downright compelling.


Simon Schama’s John Donne (1×60)

Simon Schama celebrates the life and work of Britain’s greatest love poet, John Donne. For Schama, Donne is the poet who transformed English poetry through his use of language and emotional honesty. With the help of academic John Carey and actor Fiona Shaw, he undertakes a passionate appraisal and forensic examination of Donne’s work.


My Life In Verse With… (4×60)

From Burns to Milligan, Shakespeare to John Cooper-Clarke, many people, without even realising, have fragments of poetry lodged in their brains. Some of the nation’s best-loved celebrities, including Malorie Blackman, Sheila Hancock, Cerys Matthews and Robert Webb, take a journey of discovery into the poems that inspired them.


Off By Heart, 22 May 9.00pm (1×90)

Learning by heart is one of the best ways to experience a poem, but the method has fallen from favour as part of the educational system. To encourage primary school children to engage with poetry, BBC Learning has launched a new campaign, Off By Heart. Central to the BBC’s Poetry Season, this national recitation competition which launched on National Poetry Day in October 2008 continues in 2009 with BBC Two following children across the UK as they progress from regional heats to the grand final in Oxford, compered by Jeremy Paxman.


Armando Iannucci In Milton’s Heaven And Hell (1×60)

Milton is often considered too difficult, obscure or miserable for today’s reader, but to Iannucci, Paradise Lost is a thrilling work of creative genius that we ignore at our peril. Milton tackles everything from good and evil to human freedom and the existence of God, in language unparalled in scope and variety. In the film, Iannucci explores Paradise Lost in detail and looks at the way Milton’s extraordinary life, encompassing work as ‘spin doctor’ to Oliver Cromwell, being imprisoned in the Tower of London and losing his sight, all fed into his masterpiece.


Arena – T.S Eliot (1×60)

Arena contributes to BBC Two’s Poetry Season with a profile of T.S. Eliot which, with unprecedented co-operation from the Eliot Estate, tells the story of one of the 20th century’s most celebrated and elusive writers.


BBC Four


A Poet’s Guide To Britain, starts 4 May 8.30pm (6×30)

Poet and author Owen Sheers presents this series, in which he explores six great works of poetry about the British landscape. The poems by William Wordsworth, Matthew Arnold, Lynette Roberts, Sylvia Plath, Louis MacNeice and George Mackay Brown explore a sense of place and identity across Britain while also opening doors to stories about the lives of the poets themselves.


Ian Hislop’s Changing Of The Bard, 16 May 10.00pm (1×60)

One of the most unusual offices in the British establishment, the role of the Poet Laureate, has no official job description and a small salary which is traditionally supplemented by 650 bottles of the finest sherry. As Carol Ann Duffy, the newly appointed Laureate, settles into the job, Ian Hislop presents an informed and entertaining history of the post.

 

Sir Gawain And The Green Knight (1×60)

Poet Simon Armitage goes in search of one of the jewels in the crown of British poetry, Sir Gawain And The Green Knight. Following in the footsteps of the poem’s hero, Gawain, through some of Britain’s most beautiful and mystical landscapes, Simon discovers more about the poet, his world and the stories that inspired the poem.

 

Michael Wood On Beowulf (1×60)

Historian Michael Wood returns to his first great love – the Anglo Saxon world – to reveal the origins of our literary heritage. Focusing on Beowulf and drawing on other Anglo Saxon classics he traces the birth of English Poetry back to the Dark Ages. Travelling across the British Isles from East Anglia to Scotland and with the help of Nobel prize winning poet, Seamus Heaney, actor Julian Glover, local historians and enthusiasts he brings the story and language of this iconic poem to life.

 

The People’s Poetry – 30 years Of Poetry Please (1×30), 17 May at 9.30pm

Regularly attracting 1million listeners, the world’s longest-running poetry programme, Radio 4’s Poetry Please, reaches its 30th anniversary. BBC Four pays tribute to the programme in a half-hour film.

CBeebies

Poetry Pie starts 18 May on BBC Two

Straight from the oven, CBeebies cooks up a fresh, daily serving of scrummy poetry pie in a specially created new series for three to six year olds. Poets from Brian Patten, Roger McGough and Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen to primary school pupils from across the UK contribute to a mix of funny and original rhythms and rhymes. Each episode is a unique recipe for poetic fun with every poem animated and brought vividly to life by one of five characters who act, dance and sing the words to the poems.

Radio 3

Sonnet Day, May 20

Radio 3 marks the 400th anniversary of the publication of Shakespeare’s sonnets on 20 May with 14 sonnets read by leading actors throughout the day.

Poems For Today

Starting on May 21, Radio 3 celebrates contemporary poetry with a series of more than 40 poems, broadcast daily over a six-week period, celebrating the breadth of contemporary poetry in the UK today. Each of the poems will have been written or published within the last 12 months and will reflect the range of diverse voices that exist in the UK.

 

Sunday Feature – Children Of The Whitsun Weddings, May 24

Poets Kate Clanchy and Paul Farley take a train through “Larkinland”, as they explore their mutual admiration for Philip Larkin’s work. Born within days of each other in 1965, nine months after the publication of Larkin’s The Whitsun Weddings, Kate and Paul have very different poetic voices. They travel across Britain retracing some of Larkin’s key journeys from Oxford to Hull and Leeds to London, leading the two to a series of lively interchanges on the poet’s influence on them and on their shared passion for Larkin’s work.


Drama On 3 – Idylls Of The King

Radio 3 broadcasts a new adaptation by award-winning poet Michael Symmonds Roberts of Tennyson’s epic poem telling the story of King Arthur.

Sunday Feature – Searching For Alfred: In The Shadow Of Tennyson

Poet Ruth Padel, herself inspired by Tennyson, seeks out the real Alfred and asks why he has become such a lofty remote figure. Two hundred years after his birth Ruth investigates his legacy in art, film and music of all kinds and reveals that Tennyson is a poet for our times as well as his own.

 

The Essay – Tennyson 200

Marking the 200th anniversary of the birth of one of Britain’s greatest poets, four contemporary British poets each choose a single poem or extract by Tennyson and give a personal account of why it means so much to them.

This content is in addition to Radio 3’s ongoing speech output – Between The Ears, Night Waves, Sunday Feature, The Essay and The Verb, all of which prominently feature poetry.

 

Radio 4

Radio 4 will broadcast a series of programmes on Tennyson including an edition of Poetry Please featuring readings of his poetry and Great Lives which will explore Lord Tennyson’s life and its impact.

The series of programmes will also include a dramatisation of Tennyson’s poem Maud, while Ulysses Revisited, presented by Sean O’Brien, will explore in detail Tennyson’s great poem, Ulysses.

 

Poetry Slam 2009

Radio 4 will be broadcasting its second Poetry Slam in early autumn 2009, bringing together some of the best and most popular spoken word performers from all around the country to battle it out for the title of Radio 4 Slam Winner 2009.

 

Events and online

BBC Learning is supporting the season with a host of events and online activity from May through to National Poetry Day in October.

These include:

An online vote to determine the Nation’s Favourite Poet. Compiled with the Poetry Society and The Arts Council, a shortlist of 30 of Britain’s finest poets will feature on the Poetry Season website. Gems from the BBC archive and examples of their work will help visitors to the site discover more about the shortlisted candidates. A host of celebrities will make the case for their favourite poets via a collection of short films, including John Sergeant on Betjeman, Alex James on Auden, Michelle Ryan on Rudyard Kipling and Nihal on William Blake.


A dedicated Poetry Season website, bbc.co.uk/poetryseason, launching 18 May which will serve as the destination for anyone wanting to learn more about poets and their work. Key features of the site include a poetry search engine enabling users to discover poems based on themes and moods; short films with contemporary poets featuring suggestions on how to enjoy poetry; and links to BBC Poetry Season content.


A must-watch viral campaign introducing some of the nation’s great poems and poets to young audiences and demonstrating their power in a modern context. A host of viral videos will be released throughout the season to show how poetry is a powerful and relevant form of expression.


Live events around the UK run by The Poetry Society, Apples and Snakes, Radio 4 and BBC Blast.


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